Luck, Griffin, etc.: Profiles of every first-round pick

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Luck, Griffin, etc.: Profiles of every first-round pick

From Comcast SportsNet
1. Indianapolis, Andrew Luck, qb, 6-4, 234, Stanford: A prototypical NFL QB with superior decision-making abilities, arm strength and mechanics. Father, Oliver, was also an NFL QB. 2. Washington, Robert Griffin III, qb, 6-2, junior, 223, Baylor: A fast runner and polished passer, Griffin could be a game-changer. Smart player with intangibles through the roof. 3. Cleveland Trent Richardson, rb, 5-9, 228, junior, Alabama: Compact, strong and polished downhill runner with excellent vision and acceleration. Good enough skills as a pass catcher to start. Could be best RB to enter draft in years. 4. Minnesota (from Cleveland), Matt Kalil, ot, 6-6, 306, junior, Southern Cal: Two-year starting LT with size and strength to protect blind side in NFL. Good in the run game, but will be tested by the better edge rushers. 5. Jacksonville (from Tampa Bay), Justin Blackmon, wr, 6-1, 207, junior, Oklahoma State: Jumping ability, open-field speed and possession-receiver toughness help cover for lack of elite wiggle and crisp route-running. 6. Dallas (from Washington through St. Louis), Morris Claiborne, db, 5-11, 188, junior, LSU: A talented athlete with a receiver's ball skills. Can velcro himself to WRs as long as he keeps his pads low enough. 7. Tampa Bay (from Jacksonville), Mark Barron, db, 6-1, 213, Alabama: Polished safety who can tackle and cover well. Excellent awareness highlights all his physical skills, which are strong across board. 8. Miami, Ryan Tannehill, qb, 6-4, 221, junior, Texas A&M: Good accuracy and a constant running threat, making him a raw project with promise. Converted from QB to WR and back to QB in college. 9. Carolina, Luke Kuechly, lb, 6-3, 242, junior, Boston College: A ready-made pro at inside linebacker, where he can find ball carriers and cover tight ends. 10. Buffalo, Stephon Gilmore, db, 6-0, 190, junior, South Carolina: Physical player who can disrupt WRs routes, but may struggle with advanced techniques. 11. Kansas City, Dontari Poe, dt, 6-3, 346, junior, Memphis: Big, strong and athletic, but not quite fast or nimble enough to move outside. Definitely an interior space-filler, which is not a negative. 12. Philadelphia (from Seattle), dt, Fletcher Cox, 6-4, 298, junior, Mississippi State: Furiously aggressive player who is strong, but raw. Goes for the big play. 13. Arizona, --Michael Floyd, wr, 6-3, 220, Notre Dame: Big, physical player who is a threat for the deep ball and in red-zone situations. Blocking ability a plus. Had off-field issues at Notre Dame. 14. St. Louis (from Dallas), dt, Michael Brockers, 6-5, 322, junior, LSU: Has come this far on substantial physical and mental gifts, could reach potential anywhere along the line. 15. Seattle (from Philadelphia), Bruce Irvin, de, 6-3, 245, West Virginia: A pure pass-rush play, Irvin was a workout warrior, but demonstrated a deep repertoire of pass-rush moves at WVU. Not a three-down player, but may not need to be. 16. N.Y. Jets, Quinton Coples, de, 6-6, 284, North Carolina: A big, powerful player who can disappear from time to time. 17. Cincinnati (from Oakland), Dre Kirkpatrick, db, 6-1, 186, junior, Alabama: Size may indicate a switch to safety, where his speed would play better, too. Sure tackler, but not great on balls in the air. 18. San Diego, Melvin Ingram, lb, 6-1, 264, South Carolina: A smart, athletic player who could be a hardworking contributor as OLB in some schemes. 19. Chicago, Shea McClellin, de, 6-3, 260, Boise State: Country strong, uses small size to his advantage by gaining leverage on linemen and has sure tackling ability. 20. Tennessee, Kendall Wright, wr, 5-10, 196, Baylor: Savvy and athleticism help him play above his physical limitations. Can space out at times. 21. New England (from Cincinnati), Chandler Jones, de, 6-5, 247, junior, Syracuse: A 4-3 DE whose toughness, big frame and motor show lots of potential. 22. Cleveland (from Atlanta), Brandon Weeden, qb, 6-4, 221, Oklahoma State: A 28-year-old who played minor league baseball before college football, Weeden brings maturity, accuracy and NFL-caliber arm strength and size. He has nice quick release and good touch. Struggles to retain accuracy and decision-making under pass rush. 23. Detroit, Riley Reiff, ot, 6-6, 313, junior, Iowa: Not as strong as Kalil, but nimbler and more technically sound. 24. Pittsburgh, David DeCastro, g, 6-5, 316, junior, Stanford: Three-year starter who can get on linebackers quickly in the running game. Nimble and strong. 25. New England, (from Denver), Dont'a Hightower, lb, Alabama.6-2, 265, junior, Alabama: Can shed blockers well and get to running backs. More instinctual than athletic. Some durability concerns. 26. Houston, Whitney Mercilus, lb, 6-3, 261, junior, Illinois: Fast and sudden in pass rush or against run, he can be a home-run swinger who sometimes strikes out. Long arms, relentless. 27. Cincinnati (from New Orleans through New England), Kevin Zeitler, g, 6-4, 314, Wisconsin: A big ol' road-grader in the run game, he could stand to get a bit faster and lighter. 28. Green Bay, Nick Perry, lb, 6-3, 271, junior, Southern Cal: A defensive end in college whose instincts, athleticism and size probably play better at OLB. 29. Minnesota (from Baltimore), Harrison Smith, db, 6-2, 213, Notre Dame: Has physical and mental attributes to be instant starter in NFL. Good athletic ability, but zone coverage is stronger than man. 30. San Francisco, A.J. Jenkins, wr, 6-0, 192, Illinois: Superior speed and acceleration combine with good body control to make Jenkins an appealing prospect. He's willing to go over the middle, but can't always shake DBs on the jam. 31. Tampa Bay (from New England through Denver), Doug Martin, rb, 5-9, 223, Boise State: Another polished, instinctual prospect, Martin does everything well, with the possible exception of holding onto the ball. More quick than fast, his speed is still a strong asset. 32. N.Y. Giants, David Wilson, rb, Wilson, 5-10, 206, junior, Virginia Tech: Dazzling, raw ability with higher risk and higher reward than a player such as Martin. Has speed and vision, though sometimes the cutback lanes he spies are too small.

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John Wall and Bradley Beal drop Migos references at podium after Wizards' Game 6 win

John Wall and Bradley Beal drop Migos references at podium after Wizards' Game 6 win

Friday night's decisive Game 6 may have been a pressure-packed playoff game, but John Wall was just having fun. He dropped 19 points in the fourth quarter, 42 in the game and all throughout was talking trash to a few Atlanta celebrities on the sidelines.

Yes, Falcons star wide receiver Julio Jones was sitting next to rappers Gucci Mane and Quavo and all witnessed Wall's dominant performance. Wall had some words for them during the game and afterwards when he was asked about the exchange, both he and Bradley Beal pulled out a few Migos references, as Quavo is part of the group that is currently dominating the music charts.

Towards the end of this clip, both Wizards stars say "for the culture," referring to Migos' album 'Culture.' Wall then added "that way," a line from their famous song 'Bad and Boujee.'

Smack-talking an NFL superstar and two star rappers? Now that is some serious swagger.

[RELATED: Wall may have played the best game for a Wizards player in generations]

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Redskins Draft Recap: Breaking down the late-round picks

Redskins Draft Recap: Breaking down the late-round picks

 The Redskins had a strong first two days of the 2017 NFL Draft. 

The team identified a need and were able to land a major talent in the first round with Alabama defensive lineman Jonathan Allen at No. 17.

On Day 2 The team went defensively again in the second round, drafting OLB Ryan Anderson at No. 49, a teammate of Allen's at Alabama. The Redskins' final pick of Day 2 was once again a defensive pick, with UCLA CB Fabian Moreau at No. 81.

So how did the Redskins do on the third and final day of the 2017 NFL Draft?

Here's a breakdown of the Redskins' draft picks from Round 4 to Round 7.

— Round 4, No. 7 (No. 114 Overall): RB Semaje Perine, Oklahoma

The 5-11, 233-pound has a strong build and is a heavy-hitter in-between the tackles. His best asset will be what he can do around the goal line. He doesn't have a diverse set of movements, instead relying on force and pad level. He seet a then-NCAA record with 427 yards and five touchdowns against Kansas as a freshman.

3 REASONS WHY SEMAJE PERINE PICK MAKES SENSE

 

— Round 4, No. 17 (No. 123): S Montae Nicholson, Michigan State

The Redskins needed to address their need at safety, and they did that with Nicholson. But was he the right choice? At 6-2 and 212 pounds, he has good size, but a lack of production turned scouts off. He is also dealing with a shoulder injury but expects to be ready to play at some point during training camp

WHY DRAFTING NICHOLSON IS A HEAD-SCRATCHER

 

— Round 5, No. 10 (No. 154): TE Jeremy Sprinkle, Arkansas

Great size and athleticism at 6-5 252 pounds, Sprinkle has great value because he can catch and block. He has above-average red zone effectiveness and the physical build to handle a heavy work load. Has to overcome the red flag attached to him. Was popped for shoplifting during the Razorbacks' Belk Bowl shopping spree.

3 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT JEREMY SPRINKLE
 

Round 6, No. 17 (No. 201): TBD

Round 6, No. 25 (No. 209): TBD

Round 7, No. 2 (No. 220): TBD

Round 7, No. 17 (No. 235): TBD