Heat celebrate with parade through Miami

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Heat celebrate with parade through Miami

From Comcast SportsNet
MIAMI (AP) -- The NBA championship trophy was center stage, bathed in white light and sitting on a pedestal. And each Miami Heat player offered it a different greeting. Mike Miller bowed. Udonis Haslem kissed it three times. Chris Bosh hugged it, and LeBron James strolled past before waving at the crowd. Dwyane Wade did something different. In a nod to his preferred postgame fashion style throughout the playoffs, he emerged with a pair of faux eyeglasses and slipped the frames onto the neck of the trophy. Heat president Pat Riley, coach Erik Spoelstra and team managing general partner Micky Arison all donned the black spectacles as well at various points during the party. The glasses were fake. The sentiments were all real. And with that, two years after Wade, James and Bosh opened their time together with a celebration, they got the party they really wanted on Monday. An estimated 400,000 people filled the streets of Miami for the Heat championship parade, and then 15,000 more got into the arena afterward for a long, loud reception for the NBA's new kings. "It's the best feeling I've ever had. ... This was my dream, right here, to be able to hoist that Larry O'Brien Trophy up, hug it, grab it, never want to let it go," James said. During the parade, players and coaches were on double-decker buses with friends and family, most of them taking photos and video of the crowd. Other Heat staff were on flatbed trucks, as confetti fell and horns blared every step of the way. Wade cradled the championship trophy in his arms for much of the ride. "I appreciate all our fans for sticking with us," said the now two-time NBA champion Wade, adding, "Best fans in the world." And then the party moved inside, with a similar setup to the event that welcomed James and Bosh to Miami to play alongside Wade in July 2010. Music blared for nearly an hour as fans danced for joy, before the arena went dark briefly -- and the trophy was sneaked onto the stage. For nearly 90 minutes afterward, the Heat relived so many aspects of the season, from Haslem's flagrant foul against Indiana's Tyler Hansbrough in the Eastern Conference semifinals ("the greatest flagrant foul in team history," Heat broadcaster Eric Reid told the crowd) to countless highlights from the NBA Finals against Oklahoma City, the Heat left few stones unturned. Juwan Howard -- the first member of Michigan's Fab Five to win an NBA title -- did the Cabbage Patch dance, as teammates broke into absolute hysterics, waving their arms in time with him. Mario Chalmers was asked about why Wade and James yell at him so much on the court, as a montage of some of their more fiery moments played on the giant video screens. And the Miami natives, Haslem and James Jones, got perhaps the loudest ovations of anyone outside of the finals MVP. "Feels great, man," said Haslem, who along with Wade is the lone holdover from Miami's 2006 championship club. "Changing my name from Mr. Miami to Mr. Two-Time. I ain't Mr. Miami no more. I'm Mr. Two-Time. ... It never gets old. But this one is more gratifying because of the way last season ended." Spoelstra had a similar sentiment, talking to the crowd about the team's commitment, especially after Miami lost last season's finals to Dallas. "People from the outside, they criticized this group, this team," Spoelstra said. "They counted this team out. But they never estimated how close this group was as a family. Every single one of these players had to sacrifice something, either money, opportunity, minutes to be a part of this dream. And it was all for a moment like this." After the celebrating was done, there was business. Wade reiterated that he would seek medical advice before committing to play with the Olympic team. Bosh -- who missed nine playoff games with a strained lower abdominal muscle -- said he was "all in, for now" on being part of the London Games. And Miller, who was hobbled by back and foot issues, said on Twitter he planned to meet with Miami neurosurgeon Dr. Barth Green on Tuesday, presumably to get checked out and discuss options. Miami won the title by defeating Oklahoma City in five games in the NBA Finals. It was the second title for the Heat and the first for James, who nodded and pointed to fans for much of the parade. James came to Miami after seven years in Cleveland, and after he and the Heat fell in the finals a year ago, he's finally a champion. "It's good being around other people who support LeBron," said Doug Mead of Toledo, Ohio, who came to the parade with his family. "They really don't like him in Ohio. They celebrate when he loses." Everyone was celebrating in Miami on Monday. Arison snapped and tweeted several photos during the parade. Riley shouted "Thank you" to fans over and over, as his wife, Chris, stood to his left and led "Let's go Heat" chants. Some fans began lining up for spots along the parade route Sunday night. "I've been a fan since 89. For me personally I feel like I'm part of the Heat family," said Dexter Pace of West Palm Beach, Fla. "I've been through the goods, the bads, the losses, the trades, and now it's like someone in my family has accomplished something. .... It's going to mean a lot for the city of Miami, winning the championship." As the event ended, Bosh thanked both the fans inside the arena and those outside, saying that without them, nothing would be possible for the Heat. "It feels right," Bosh said. "This is how it's supposed to be ... and I would like to do it all the time."

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Scott Brooks ready to compete with Warriors' Kevin Durant for the first time

Scott Brooks ready to compete with Warriors' Kevin Durant for the first time

On Tuesday night at the Verizon Center, Scott Brooks will for the first time in his coaching career be on the opposite bench of Kevin Durant, a former MVP and Brooks' best player during the seven years he coached the Oklahoma City Thunder. It is not an enviable task coaching, against Durant. Brooks knows what he is capable of and is looking forward to the challenge.

Well, sort of.

"You have to hope that Coach [Steve] Kerr will sit him out. That's a good start. They have three in four nights coming up, so I think he should rest," Brooks joked ahead of the Wizards' matchup with the Warriors [6:30 p.m. on CSN].

In all seriousness, Brooks will enjoy catching up with Durant. The two have remained in touch ever since Brooks was fired by OKC following the 2014-15 season.

"We text throughout the season. I don't know if that's illegal. I just lost some money, I guess," Brooks said with a smile. "It's just 'how are you doing Kevin, how's the family?' That's it. We went through a lot together and I appreciate what he's gone through and the way he's always handled himself... I've been with him through some very tough times. We've had some great moments together. Conference finals after conference finals, the NBA Finals while being a young team, his MVP year; we've just had so many moments. He's just a great person."

It's easy to tell that Brooks admires the man Durant has become. Brooks has known the eight-time All-Star ever since his rookie year when he was just 19 years old and playing for the Seattle Supersonics. In the 10 years since, he's watched Durant grow up, deal with both success and failure, and then ultimately make the decision to leave Oklahoma City in free agency. All of that came after a rough childhood growing up in Prince George's County in Maryland.

"I like the progress that he's made as a man. We all saw a young man grow up in front of our eyes and not only meet all the expectations, but he's overcome a lot. I know his story as a child with his mom and grandma, they did a great job of instilling important values that are going to continue to carry him throughout his life. I feel like I was a part of helping raise him as a good pro. That's what you want to do as a coach is teach these guys how to be pros. That's to me the No. 1 job as a coach," Brooks explained.

[RELATED: Durant reveals why he didn't even talk to Wizards]

"You have to understand that they are going through some trying times and you have to understand how to help them through it. Get them through it and also understand that when you do get through it, and when you have some success, how do you handle that? The thing I like is how he handed it when he got through it. He was the MVP and the next day you would have never known. You would have never known he was MVP. You could probably not talk to me this day if I won MVP."

On Monday at Wizards practice, Brooks recalled the early days of Durant in Seattle and OKC, how he was just a kid who couldn't bench press 200 pounds and never washed his face.

"The talk [before the draft] was that he wasn't strong enough. That's [so] overrated… I don't know if every team does that, the bench press. If we are in the strongman competition, then you don't want Kevin on your team, but the ball is not that heavy. He can pick that up pretty good. I knew he was a natural. He's just a natural talent. He just had a good feel for the game. The thing that really stood out was his work ethic. That guy, it just doesn't happen overnight. He didn't become MVP overnight. He didn't become one of the best players overnight. He's put a lot of time and work in. I was fortunate enough to be around him for seven years," Brooks said.

"He's going to go down as one of the best players ever. But the thing that [Golden State] didn't realize they were getting is a great guy and a great teammate. That takes you a lot longer down the road than just having a great player. He's as good as advertised off the court... they got an incredible person that always wants to do the right thing. Sometimes it's not easy to do the right thing, but he doesn't choose the easy path. He goes down the path that you would be proud of."

[RELATED: Beal on Durant: 'I didn't think he was going to come here']

CAA Tournament: Bracket, when and how to watch

CAA Tournament: Bracket, when and how to watch

Throughout the regular season, UNC-Wilmington (26-5, 15-3) has been the favorite to win the Colonial Athletic Association. Perhaps there was even a chance for the Seahawks to get an at-large tournament bid if they were to lose in the conference tournament. 

A handful of losses to CAA opponents, William and Mary, College of Charleston, and Elon changed that tone. 

In order for the Seahawks to make the NCAA tournament and repeat as champions they have to win the conference tournament. However, every other team in the conference will be battling for a chance in the tournament as well.

One the teams on the radar is Charleston (23-8, 14-4) who beat Wilmington at home earlier in the season and has not lost to a team below .500 all season. Emerging as a suprise team in CAA play this year, the Cougars appear to be the biggest threat to Wilimington as the tournament hosts in the North Charleston Coliseum in North Charleston, South Carolina.

Of course you can never count out long-time CAA members, William and Mary (16-13, 10-8) and Towson (19-12, 11-7).

BRACKET: 

First Round (March 3rd): 

#8 Hofstra vs. #9 Delaware 6:00 p.m.
#7 James Madison vs. #10 Drexel 8:30 p.m.

Quarterfinals (March 4th):

#1 UNC-Wilmington vs. Winner of Hofstra/Delaware 12:00 p.m.
#4 William and Mary vs. #5 Elon 2:30 p.m.
#2 Charleston vs. Winner of James Madison/Drexel 6:00 p.m.
#3 Towson vs. #6 Northeastern 8:30 p.m.

Semifinals (March 5th)

Winner of Quaterfinal #1 vs. Winner of Quarterfinal #2 2:00 p.m.
Winner of Quarerfinal #3 vs. Winner of Quarterfinal #4 7:00 p.m.

Championship (March 6th):

Winner of Semifinal #1 vs. Winner of Semifinal #2 7:00 p.m.

HOW TO WATCH:

First Round: CAA.tv

Quaterfinals: Comcast SportsNet regional networks

Semifinals: Comcast SportsNet regional networks

Championship: CBS Sports Network

 

The CAA Champion will then have to wait until March 12 for Selection Sunday to find out when and where they will play.