Free agents reject $13.3M deals as GMs head home

Free agents reject $13.3M deals as GMs head home

INDIAN WELLS, Calif. (AP) Josh Hamilton, B.J. Upton and Kyle Lohse were among nine free agents who turned down $13.3 million offers from their former clubs Friday as the annual general managers' ended and team officials headed home for what figures to be a busy month of negotiations.

Also rejecting the one-year guaranteed offers were the New York Yankees' trio of Nick Swisher, Rafael Soriano and Hiroki Kuroda along with David Ortiz, Michael Bourn and Adam LaRoche.

Under baseball's new labor contract, all the deadlines of the business season has been speeded up in an attempt to prompt quicker decisions before the Christmas holidays. That should create more activity in the market before teams head to the winter meetings in Nashville, Tenn., from Dec. 3-6.

``It expedites things, People are out there and available and being discussed right away,'' said Dave Dombrowski, president of the AL champion Detroit Tigers. ``It definitely has picked things up more quickly.''

Under the old rules, teams had until Dec. 7 to offer salary arbitration to their former players who became free agents. Top players under a statistical formula that was part of the 1981 strike settlement had compensation attached if they signed with new clubs - which would lose high-round draft picks.

Under the labor contract agreed to last November, that system was replaced by qualifying offers. A team could make a qualifying offer last week that was the average of the 125 highest big league contracts by average annual value - $13.3 million this year.

Just nine of 165 major league free agents were given the offers - Ortiz then agreed to a $26 million, two-year deal to stay with the Red Sox. The group all said no in anticipation of receiving more dollars and years in the open market.

Now if they switch teams, their new club will lose a draft choice next June - its highest pick, unless that selection is among the top 10 in the first round. If a club signs more than one qualified free agent, it forfeits its highest remaining pick for each additional qualified free agent it adds.

For some of the remaining eight players, compensation may cause some teams to shy away.

``Would I have less interest in guys if I lost my No. 1 pick? Yes,'' Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said. ``I've been recently trying to steer clear of losing our draft pick.''

In the past decade, free agents requiring compensation ranged from a low of 12 in 2003 to a high of 41 the following year - with the average at 22. The new rules mean teams can sign more players without figuring in the loss of draft selections, who are prized because they are years from eligibility for arbitration and free agency.

Only the elite players require compensation. The group that's below them include pitchers Zack Greinke and Ryan Dempster, outfielders Torii Hunter and Ichiro Suzuki, catcher Mike Napoli and first baseman Carlos Pena. Melky Cabrera, the All-Star game MVP, also is available after serving his 50-game suspension for a positive drug test.

``Most qualifying offers are really for players of the highest value,'' agent Scott Boras said. ``There's a lot of good players that didn't receive qualifying offers. It allows for so much earlier planning than the other system, so I think it's really been very good. It allows more freedom for those players that fit below that top regime of talent.''

There wasn't a major trade announced during the three-day session, and the podium at the Hyatt Regency Indian Wells Resort & Spa - owned by Colorado Rockies owner Dick Monfort - wasn't used a single time.

But there was ample discussion among team executives and with the many agents on hand. While in past seasons teams held off completing free agent deals until Dec. 8 - not wanting to lose draft picks - they anticipate being more aggressive.

Trade talks appear to be in the feeling-out stage. Among the players who might be available are Arizona outfielder Justin Upton and Boston outfielder Jacoby Ellsbury.

``Individually there might be people who are gaining momentum in their discussions,'' Cashman said. ``I'm not.''

NOTES: Physicist Leonard Mlodinow addressed the GMs Friday and they were given copies of his book, ``The Drunkard's Walk: How Randomness Rules our Lives.''

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Redskins add Brian Quick as receiving corps trends much taller than last season

Redskins add Brian Quick as receiving corps trends much taller than last season

The Redskins’ wide receiver corps is growing in more ways than one.

The team has signed former Rams wide receiver Brian Quick, according to the player’s agent. At 6-4, he would have towered over most of the Redskins’ other wide receivers a year ago. Now he’s just another tree in the forest.

The starting wide receivers were Pierre Garçon, who was 6-0, and DeSean Jackson, who was listed at 5-10 but that was being a bit generous. Now the Redskins will line up Terrelle Pryor, 6-4, on one side and the 6-2 Josh Doctson on the other. As substitutes they will be able to bring in Quick and the 6-3 Maurice Harris.

RELATED: NFL Mock Draft Version 6.0

It should be noted that Jamison Crowder is the favorite to end up as the team’s leading receiver and he measures 5-9. So it won’t be all about the big guys but having so many tall targets will help Kirk Cousins in the red zone, where the team struggled last year.

Being tall is one thing, but Quick must prove that he can be a consistently productive NFL receiver. Actually, the Redskins would be very happy if he can produce for them like he did for the Rams in 2016 when he caught 41 passes for 564 yards and three touchdowns. But before last year he never had more than 25 receptions or 375 yards in a single season.

MORE REDSKINS: Redskins mock draft roundup: Will Foster fall?

Quick’s addition could put the Redskins career of Ryan Grant in some jeopardy. Grant has been a favorite of the coaches of his work ethic but after playing 16 games in each of his three NFL seasons he has averaged 13 receptions for 137 yards per year. That makes it hard to stay around for a fourth year.

Stay up to date on the Redskins! Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerCSN and follow him on Twitter @Rich_TandlerCSN.

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2017 ballpark foods that are way better than peanuts and Cracker Jack

2017 ballpark foods that are way better than peanuts and Cracker Jack

Back in the olden days, cotton candy or a plate of nachos were considered bold ballpark snacks. Thankfully, the olden days are over, and a new era of ballpark food has begun.

And in this era, a menu item isn't considered complete until it's fried, sandwiched between something else and then finally drizzled with some sort of sauce. 

So, what's on the menu for 2017? Well, peanuts, hot dogs and apple pie nachos, of course.

CLICK HERE TO FEAST YOUR EYES ON THE CRAZIEST BALLPARK FOODS YOU'LL FIND AROUND MLB THIS YEAR

With a new season about to begin, CSNmidatlantic.com has identified 10 of the most eye-popping and artery-clogging foods available around Major League Baseball in 2017. To see them, simply click on the link above or below to open our gallery (no fork and knife necessary).

After all, while peanuts and Cracker Jack are cute, they simply can't match up with a hot dog topped with bacon and a fried egg. 

CLICK HERE TO FEAST YOUR EYES ON THE CRAZIEST BALLPARK FOODS YOU'LL FIND AROUND MLB THIS YEAR