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After further review: Redskins-Bucs first half

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After further review: Redskins-Bucs first half

Here are my observations after taking a second look at the game. First half is here, second half will be posted at 5:00 p.m.First quarter--Griffins cadence drew the Bucs offside on the very first offensive play. You couldnt hear the snap count but you can see Griffins head bobbing. The linebacker on the right side jumped on the first hut, the ball was snapped on the second one.--Rob Jackson was not quite as stellar in this game as he was in his starting debut against the Bengals. Wide receiver Arrelious Benn literally faked Jackson onto the ground on an end around. Jackson could have had him after a short gain but Benn picked up 10 yards and a first down. By the way, the Redskins need to do a better job of defending that play. The Bengals got at least three first downs off of it last week.--On the second play of their first touchdown drive, Griffin pitched the ball back to Alfred Morris, who was in an I formation. He caught the pitch about five yards behind the line of scrimmage and he could immediately turn his attention upfield. That allowed him to identify the gaping hole on the right side and he bolted through it and wasnt taken down until he had picked up 17 yards.--On the next play, Fred Davis did a heck of a job pass blocking against defensive lineman Daniel Teo-Nesheim, who lined up at right end in a three-point stance. Davis engaged the lineman and stuck to him. Teo-Nesheim broke loose eventually but Davis pushed him to the ground. That allowed Griffin to step up into the pocket and flip a pass to fullback Darrel Young, who broke a tackle and rumbled for 30 yards. None of that happens without Davis pass blocking.--First and 20? Years past, a big problem. On this play, no problem. After a holding penalty, Griffin waited until just the right moment and flipped to Davis just behind the line. Linebacker David Lavonte was able to avoid Chris Chesters block a few yards downfield but the linebacker was late getting to Davis and the tight end dismissed him with a stiffarm to the face. Further downfield he skirted an attempted tackle by Ronde Barber and was finally pushed out of bounds at the 14 after a gain of 20.--Griffin needs to be careful with the ball. Its great that he wanted to score as he approached the goal line on a third and five play from the Bucs nine. But he waited a step or two too long to protect the ball as two defenders converged on him near the goal line. He already had the first down but the ball got knocked out as he went for the end zone. Fortunately Pierre Garon caught the ball bouncing in the end zone out of the corner of his eye and pounced on it for the touchdown.Second quarter--Im not much for symbolic gestures on the field, I dont think they matter all that much. But in the first quarter, DeAngelo Hall put a legal shoulder into Josh Freeman to tackle the quarterback after a sort gain. A Bucs offensive lineman went up to Hall and barked in his face, apparently telling Hall to lay off of his quarterback. In the second quarter, rookie Mark Barron drew a (borderline) flag for picking up Griffin on an option plan and dumping him to the ground. There was no response from anyone on the offensive line. Again, its nothing major but you would like to see a message being sent.--They could have doubled the width of the goal posts and Billy Cundiffs first field goal try from 41 yards still would have been wide right.--It looked like Barry Cofield got a fingertip or two on the Freeman pass that Hall intercepted. Give some credit to Ryan Kerrigan on the play as well for relentlessly driving towards Freeman despite the tackle being engaged and forcing him to step up towards the line.--Gerald McCoy is a third-year player and he should know better than to jump offside on a hard count on fourth and a long one. The Redskins ran the play and got a first down anyway as Alfred Morris ran right through the hole created by McCoys premature movement.--Last week, RG3 scooted outside for a touchdown in a goal to go situation. This week the Bucs spread out their defense to try to stop that and he scoots right up the middle for five yards and a score. Too easy, no wonder he was laughing while looking at pictures on the bench with Kyle Shanahan after the score.--Morris made a good, quick decision that got him a 39-yard touchdown run. He cut through the left side of the line, planted his foot and took off back to the right. Eric Wright was the only Buc to touch him and he just barely nipped his ankles. Leonard Hankerson stuck with his block downfield and that was all Morris needed to dash into the end zone.--I dont understand getting conservative in the last two minutes. After getting a first down at their own 35, the Redskins went with a pass behind the line to Morris that lost four yards and two draw plays. Youd think that Mike and Kyle would be more aggressive here with their quarterback who seems to be capable of just about anything and at least try to get back the field goal they just gave up. Yes, they were getting the second-half kickoff but they could have treated it like an opportunity to score 10 straight points without the Bucs getting the ball. That would have put the game away.--Then, after a short Bucs punt, they get aggressive with 14 second left. Passes to wide receivers Hankerson and Morgan picked up about 18 yards and getting the Redskins into position to at least try a long field goal. Where was that approach a minute and a half earlier?

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Following NFL trend, Redskins sell naming rights for practice facility

Following NFL trend, Redskins sell naming rights for practice facility

Throughout the league, NFL teams have sold naming rights to their practice facilities.

Now the Redskins are joining that club through a partnership with Inova: Redskins Park, the team's practice facility in Ashburn, Va., will be renamed Inova Sports Performance Center at Redskins Park, the team announced.

The partnership will go well beyond just naming rights, as the team and Inova will work together to promote health and wellness throughout the D.C. area including television (NBC4) and radio (Sportstalk 570/ESPN980) programming, as well as developing plans to improve health in the community, including breast cancer awareness and concussion testing.

The team's decision to sell naming rights to Redskins Park should come as no surprise.

The two closest geographic teams to Washington both have sold naming rights to their practice facilities: The Ravens practice at the Under Armour Performance Center and the Eagles practice at the NovaCare Complex. A host of teams have sponsors attached to their practice locales, including Pittsburgh, Houston and others.

"We are not only excited, we are honored to be working with Inova, a world class leader in healthcare," Redskins CMO/EVP Terry Bateman, Redskins said in a release. "This partnership will benefit the community and uphold our commitment to have the healthiest fans in the NFL."

Earlier this year, the Redskins announced that Dr. Robin West of Inova would take over as team physician. That move made West the first female team doctor in the NFL. Inova is a not-for-profit healthcare system based in Northern Virginia that serves more than 2 million people throughout the D.C. area and beyond.

RELATED: RANKING THE REDSKINS ROSTER

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Can Redskins' Cousins continue to avoid the turnover bug?

Can Redskins' Cousins continue to avoid the turnover bug?

During the Kirk Cousins franchise tag/long-term contract debate, the question of whether or not Cousins could continue to play as well as he did in the last 10 games of 2015 was pivotal. In that stretch of games he completed 72.4 percent of his passes with an average of 8.7 yards per attempt with 23 touchdowns and three interceptions. His passer rating was 119.1.

Those who saw that run as a fluke were not inclined to want the Redskins to give Cousins a long-term deal near the top of the quarterback pay scale. Those who saw the stretch as things clicking for a quarterback in his first year as a starter were inclined to lobby the Redskins to lock him up no matter what it cost.

How realistic is it to expect Cousins to repeat that stretch over a full season? It would be difficult. His completion percentage of 72.4 would top Drew Brees’ single-season record of 71.2 percent. The passer rating of 119.1 would be the fourth best of all time, better than any season ever posted by Tom Brady, Steve Young, Breese, and others.

From the same perspective, it might be a little easier for Cousins to repeat what he did in the interception department. In the last 10 games he threw three of them in 315 pass attempts, a percentage of 1.0 percent. Eight quarterbacks have had an interception percentage of 1.0 or lower for a full season. Some of them, like Tom Brady and Aaron Rodgers, are among the best quarterbacks ever. Others, like Damon Huard, Nick Foles and Joe Ferguson, are not.

A look at the single-season leaders list implies that some luck may be involved when it comes to interception avoidance. You see a lot of players, like Huard, Ferguson, Seneca Wallace, Brian Griese, and, yes, Robert Griffin III who have seasons ranking in the top 30 of all time and never came close to duplicating it again. Griese, for example, had 1.2 percent of his passes intercepted in 10 games in 2000. In his 10 NFL seasons before and after that he never had an interception percentage lower than 3.6; his career average was 3.5 percent. That’s about a percentage point over average.

Was Cousins just lucky towards the end of last year? Some who have looked at the latter part of his season closely think so. Matt Williamson does scouting work for ESPN and some other publications. Focusing just on the last half of the season, he said that he saw a lot of interceptions dropped.

While he only threw two interceptions during that eight-game stretch, quite a few more easily could have ended up in the other team’s hands - and probably should have. This was even truer in his uninspiring playoff game against Green Bay, the last time we saw Cousins.

I will say that I am suspicious of statements like that. How many is “quite a few”? Four? Ten? More? What is the standard for a “drop”? And all quarterbacks benefit from would-be interceptions that get dropped. How do Cousins’ dropped picks compare to those of other quarterbacks? More? Fewer? About the same?

But there it is and you can take it however you would like. The fact that he had a career 3.9 interception percentage going into that 10-game stretch lends some credence to the theory that Cousins benefitted from some good luck. But it’s also possible that he figured out how to avoid the turnover bug after 15 NFL starts prior to the game against the Bucs that got things rolling for him.

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OPEN THREAD: Las Vegas betting information shows lack of respect for Redskins

OPEN THREAD: Las Vegas betting information shows lack of respect for Redskins

Last year the Redskins won nine games and took the NFC East title. Washington brings back largely the same team for 2016, and had a quiet, relatively drama free offseason. 

But in Las Vegas, none of that matters. 

Washington opens the year at home as underdogs against the Steelers, and considering that home field is generally worth three points toward the spread, clearly the betmakers don't expect much from the 'Skins. Or the betting public doesn't, that's for sure.

MORE REDSKINS: NILES PAUL STILL AN OPTION

Pittsburgh is good, last year they went 10-6 and have two of the games best in QB Ben Roethlisberger and WR Antonio Brown. Star running back Le'Veon Bell may miss the game, however, due to a suspension. It will be interesting to see if the line moves once Bell's situation becomes finalized.

Surprised by the overwhelming Steelers support? Should the spread look different? Let us know what you think in the comments.