Quick Links

20 questions in 20 days: 5 Will running back by committee work?

20 questions in 20 days: 5 Will running back by committee work?

By Rich Tandler and Tarik El-Bashir20 questions in 20 daysAs we count down to the first game of the Redskins season, Tarik El-Bashir and Rich Tandler are going to be looking at some of the big questions facing the team and attempting to look into their crystal balls and answer them.Question 5:Will a running back by committee approach work?The background:Ever since Clinton Portis sustained a concussion midway through the 2009 season, the Redskins have not had a workhorse running back. It doesnt look like things are going to change this year. Evan Royster, Roy Helu Jr., and Alfred Morris all have their strong points but none of them has demonstrated the ability to tote the rock 20 times a game, week in and week out. That means that all three of them will have to carry the load if the Redskins are going to be successful running the ball.Tandler:The workhorse back is becoming a thing of the past in what has become a passing league. Neither Super Bowl participant had a runner with as many as 200 carries. While it may be nice to have a prime back like Ray Rice (291 rushing attempt) or Frank Gore (292), its not necessary to win. Having a productive running game is still important but having one back get the lions share of the carries is not. What the Redskins need is a change of approach. Since Portis faded from the scene they have run with one back until he was injured or became ineffective and then switched to the next guy. What Mike and Kyle Shanahan need to do is come up with a plan to rotate the backs, play to their strengths, and keep them fresh and healthy. A planned running back by committee approach will work; riding one back until he drops and then saddling up the next one will not.El-Bashir:Although we dont know how the Shanahans plan to deploy their stable of running backs, it appears the coaching staff is leaning toward utilizing all three -- and for good reason. Royster is rugged and instinctive. Helu is elusive, a decent receiver and an effective pass protector. Morris makes one cut and hes gone. While none is of the featured back variety, the trio could form a potent combination, particularly if opposing defenses become preoccupied with the possibility of quarterback Robert Griffin III taking off with the ball as well. But there are concerns. Royster, Helu and Morris have a grand total of seven NFL starts between them. Another is health. Royster missed time in the preseason with knee and neck ailments, while Helu was sidelined with two sore Achilles tendons. Considering both were hobbled by injuries at various points last season, too, its a major concern.20 questions in 20 days20 Aug.20Will Jammal Brown play this year?
19 Aug.21Will Chris Cooley make the team?
18 Aug. 22Can Brandon Meriweather get he job done at safety?
17 Aug. 23Is Garon a No. 1 receiver?
16 Aug. 24Can Trent Williams go from good to great?
15 Aug. 25Can DeAngelo Hall be a defensive playmaker?
14 Aug. 26Can Santana Moss regain his old form?
13 Aug. 27Can Orakpo post 15 sacks?
12 Aug. 28Will Leonard Hankerson break out?
11 Aug. 29Can the Redskins flip their turnover ratio?
10 Aug. 30How much can Hightower contribute this year?
9 Aug. 31Was making Billy Cundiff the kicker a good move?
8 Sept. 1Will Josh Morgan be worth the investment?
7 Sept. 2What can Jarvis Jenkins contribute?
6 YesterdayIs the offensive line depth good enough?
5 TodayWill a running back by committee work?
4 TomorrowShould we expect a sophomore slump from Ryan Kerrigan?
3 ThursdayHow many wins is enough?
2 FridayHow much should RG3 run?
1 SaturdayCan RG3 . . . ?

Quick Links

Following NFL trend, Redskins sell naming rights for practice facility

Following NFL trend, Redskins sell naming rights for practice facility

Throughout the league, NFL teams have sold naming rights to their practice facilities.

Now the Redskins are joining that club through a partnership with Inova: Redskins Park, the team's practice facility in Ashburn, Va., will be renamed Inova Sports Performance Center at Redskins Park, the team announced.

The partnership will go well beyond just naming rights, as the team and Inova will work together to promote health and wellness throughout the D.C. area including television (NBC4) and radio (Sportstalk 570/ESPN980) programming, as well as developing plans to improve health in the community, including breast cancer awareness and concussion testing.

The team's decision to sell naming rights to Redskins Park should come as no surprise.

The two closest geographic teams to Washington both have sold naming rights to their practice facilities: The Ravens practice at the Under Armour Performance Center and the Eagles practice at the NovaCare Complex. A host of teams have sponsors attached to their practice locales, including Pittsburgh, Houston and others.

"We are not only excited, we are honored to be working with Inova, a world class leader in healthcare," Redskins CMO/EVP Terry Bateman, Redskins said in a release. "This partnership will benefit the community and uphold our commitment to have the healthiest fans in the NFL."

Earlier this year, the Redskins announced that Dr. Robin West of Inova would take over as team physician. That move made West the first female team doctor in the NFL. Inova is a not-for-profit healthcare system based in Northern Virginia that serves more than 2 million people throughout the D.C. area and beyond.

RELATED: RANKING THE REDSKINS ROSTER

Quick Links

Can Redskins' Cousins continue to avoid the turnover bug?

Can Redskins' Cousins continue to avoid the turnover bug?

During the Kirk Cousins franchise tag/long-term contract debate, the question of whether or not Cousins could continue to play as well as he did in the last 10 games of 2015 was pivotal. In that stretch of games he completed 72.4 percent of his passes with an average of 8.7 yards per attempt with 23 touchdowns and three interceptions. His passer rating was 119.1.

Those who saw that run as a fluke were not inclined to want the Redskins to give Cousins a long-term deal near the top of the quarterback pay scale. Those who saw the stretch as things clicking for a quarterback in his first year as a starter were inclined to lobby the Redskins to lock him up no matter what it cost.

How realistic is it to expect Cousins to repeat that stretch over a full season? It would be difficult. His completion percentage of 72.4 would top Drew Brees’ single-season record of 71.2 percent. The passer rating of 119.1 would be the fourth best of all time, better than any season ever posted by Tom Brady, Steve Young, Breese, and others.

From the same perspective, it might be a little easier for Cousins to repeat what he did in the interception department. In the last 10 games he threw three of them in 315 pass attempts, a percentage of 1.0 percent. Eight quarterbacks have had an interception percentage of 1.0 or lower for a full season. Some of them, like Tom Brady and Aaron Rodgers, are among the best quarterbacks ever. Others, like Damon Huard, Nick Foles and Joe Ferguson, are not.

A look at the single-season leaders list implies that some luck may be involved when it comes to interception avoidance. You see a lot of players, like Huard, Ferguson, Seneca Wallace, Brian Griese, and, yes, Robert Griffin III who have seasons ranking in the top 30 of all time and never came close to duplicating it again. Griese, for example, had 1.2 percent of his passes intercepted in 10 games in 2000. In his 10 NFL seasons before and after that he never had an interception percentage lower than 3.6; his career average was 3.5 percent. That’s about a percentage point over average.

Was Cousins just lucky towards the end of last year? Some who have looked at the latter part of his season closely think so. Matt Williamson does scouting work for ESPN and some other publications. Focusing just on the last half of the season, he said that he saw a lot of interceptions dropped.

While he only threw two interceptions during that eight-game stretch, quite a few more easily could have ended up in the other team’s hands - and probably should have. This was even truer in his uninspiring playoff game against Green Bay, the last time we saw Cousins.

I will say that I am suspicious of statements like that. How many is “quite a few”? Four? Ten? More? What is the standard for a “drop”? And all quarterbacks benefit from would-be interceptions that get dropped. How do Cousins’ dropped picks compare to those of other quarterbacks? More? Fewer? About the same?

But there it is and you can take it however you would like. The fact that he had a career 3.9 interception percentage going into that 10-game stretch lends some credence to the theory that Cousins benefitted from some good luck. But it’s also possible that he figured out how to avoid the turnover bug after 15 NFL starts prior to the game against the Bucs that got things rolling for him.

Quick Links

OPEN THREAD: Las Vegas betting information shows lack of respect for Redskins

OPEN THREAD: Las Vegas betting information shows lack of respect for Redskins

Last year the Redskins won nine games and took the NFC East title. Washington brings back largely the same team for 2016, and had a quiet, relatively drama free offseason. 

But in Las Vegas, none of that matters. 

Washington opens the year at home as underdogs against the Steelers, and considering that home field is generally worth three points toward the spread, clearly the betmakers don't expect much from the 'Skins. Or the betting public doesn't, that's for sure.

MORE REDSKINS: NILES PAUL STILL AN OPTION

Pittsburgh is good, last year they went 10-6 and have two of the games best in QB Ben Roethlisberger and WR Antonio Brown. Star running back Le'Veon Bell may miss the game, however, due to a suspension. It will be interesting to see if the line moves once Bell's situation becomes finalized.

Surprised by the overwhelming Steelers support? Should the spread look different? Let us know what you think in the comments.