Coughlin talks it out with emotional RB Bradshaw

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Coughlin talks it out with emotional RB Bradshaw

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) Playing with emotion makes Ahmad Bradshaw one of the NFL's toughest running backs.

Putting them on display Sunday with the running game struggling came close to getting the New York Giants veteran in big trouble with coach Tom Coughlin.

An angry and frustrated Bradshaw slapped Victor Cruz in the back of the helmet after the receiver missed a block on a third-quarter run, and then screamed at his 66-year-old coach minutes later to run the ball more as the offense went on the field following a Redskins' turnover.

A disciplinarian, Coughlin yelled right back at Bradshaw.

The coach addressed the issue Monday with his No. 1 running back, but would not disclose what was said a day after the Giants (5-2) rallied for a 27-23 win over Washington on a 77-yard pass from Eli Manning to Victor Cruz with 1:13 to play.

``There's never been any question about Ahmad Bradshaw's toughness, his intensity level,'' Coughlin said. ``He plays the game hard. You'd like to have everybody play as hard he plays, to be honest with you. He gives it everything he's got. You want people to recognize that fact, but sometimes you do have to control yourself and control your emotions ... and he's working on it.''

Bradshaw said Coughlin's response was as animated as his, but both men felt it was a heat-of-the-moment exchange.

``That is the thing about this team, we all just want to win and anything we can do to help, I think it helps,'' said Bradshaw, who tossed his helmet after sitting on the bench following the incident.

Bradshaw, who had rushed for a combined 316 yards the previous two games, let his emotions get the best of him in the third quarter of a game in which Washington was stuffing New York's run repeatedly. It started after a 15-yard run to the left, his longest run on an afternoon where he gained 43 yards on 12 carries.

The play had the potential for more, but Cruz missed a downfield block on Washington's Madieu Williams and the safety upended Bradshaw. The running back quickly got up, went right at Cruz and screamed at him while slapping him in the back of the helmet.

Cruz laughed when asked if he suffered a concussion from the hard slap. But he also said he wasn't offended, saying Bradshaw wants the best from everyone on the offense.

``We understand what kind of person Ahmad is and we understand he's emotional and he wears his heart on his sleeve,'' Cruz said. ``He's the pulse of the offense sometimes. The way he runs the ball, he wants the ball every chance he gets. And we understand that. The emotions (are) just what he brings to the table. We respect it. Obviously from the outside looking in, it looks a little iffy.

``But all that matters is what we think about him in this locker room, and (on) the coaching staff.''

Manning said the Giants appreciate how Bradshaw works, especially in a week where he was bothered by a foot injury.

``He does a great job in running hard and I think he thought he had a shot to break even a bigger run on that play,'' Manning said. ``So, he's trying to make sure those guys know that he tries to do everything to protect and give them opportunities to make plays. He wants the same in return.''

Teammates had no problem with Bradshaw's actions.

"Hey, if I'm going to a fight, I'm taking Ahmad with me,'' safety Antrel Rolle said. ``I love that guy, I love his passion, I love the attitude he brings to a game. He's a very emotional guy. Nothing he does is meant to be disturbing to anyone else. It may come across like that, it may not. But we all know Ahmad means the world (to us).

``We ride or die with Ahmad.''

Guard Kevin Boothe said football is an emotional game and players yell at times, noting Bradshaw's blowup drew more attention because he is a high-profile player on a champion team.

``He's the starting running back for the New York Giants,'' Boothe said. ``If he's yelling, I think that draws more attention than if I'm yelling. I think if we're both yelling on the sideline, chances are you guys will pick up Ahmad Bradshaw rather than Kevin Boothe.''

Tight end Martellus Bennett said Bradshaw is the same person whether he's on the field, in the locker room or eating lunch.

``That's why we love him,'' Bennett said. ``I don't know a good adjective to describe him, but Ahmad is Ahmad. That's who he is.''

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Kings-Pelicans trade puts more options on table for Wizards

Kings-Pelicans trade puts more options on table for Wizards

NEW ORLEANS -- Suddenly, the market has become flooded with names who could/will be on the move which should make for a lot of action going into Thursday afternoon's NBA trade deadline. Despite not having a lot of wiggle room, the Wizards find themselves in a better spot than anticipated.

There are a lot of sellers out there with the Sacramento Kings having waived forward Matt Barnes after trading DeMarcus Cousins.

Former Wizards guard Garrett Temple told CSNmidatlantic.com in a conversation early Monday that Barnes was one of the three best teammates he has ever had in Sacramento, and that includes stops with the Spurs, Rockets, Bucks, Hornets and four full seasons in Washington. Former Wizards Jared Dudley also chimed in during a Twitter exchange about Barnes, who is known for his fiery temper and clashing publicly with Derek Fisher over his ex-wife. 

The Wizards likely will do something to retool their bench now that they're in good position at 34-21 coming out of the All-Star break and in third place in the East. 

They could use another scorer, ideally at shooting guard behind Bradley Beal. Barnes, a 6-7, is a small forward who can play at the stretch position, too.

[RELATED: Kings no longer have Cousins to blame for dysfunction]

He averaged 7.6 points, 5.5 rebounds and 2.8 assists in 54 games for Sacramento this season. He was among the players brought in to help guide Cousins but became expendable when Buddy Hield and Tyreke Evans were acquired in the deal. 

If a team were to claim Barnes during the 48-hour period on waivers, they'd be responsible for the balance of his $6.1 million salary for this season. It was the first year of a two-year deal for $12.5 million.

Barnes isn't the only one who could be on the market as a result of Cousins' trade. New Orleans and Sacramento appear willing to part with assests for draft picks:

Darren Collison, Kings: The point guard is averaging 13.7 points, 4.2 assists and a career-high 42.1% from the three-point line. He's a starter on a reasonable mid-level exception contract of $5.3 million and will become unrestricted this summer. But would he be in addition to Trey Burke or in place of him?

Ben McLemore, Kings: They've been willing to move the 2013 lottery pick for quite some time. A shooting guard, he averages just 6.6 points and shoots 41.2% from the field. The light appears never to have come on and he turned off the Wizards during the pre-draft process. They wanted to arrange a workout but he wasn't organized, willing or able to meet with them. They ended up taking Otto Porter which was expected, but that didn't leave a good impression. And what he's done so far in the league hasn't, either. McLemore is in the final year of his rookie scale contract that pays $4 million and will be restricted if the team that owns his rights this summer make him a qualifying offer. If not, he becomes unrestricted.

Arron Afflalo, Kings: A 6-5 shooting guard, he's likely able to be had, too. At 31, he was part of the veteran group the Kings put around Cousins to no avail. A year ago, Afflalo looked like a possible free-agent steal when he signed a two-year, $25 million deal. He's had a terrible season, averaging just 7.8 points as a starter and shooting just 43%. But defensively, which was supposed to be his strong suit, is where he has declined most. Not the same player he used to be.

Terrence Jones, Pelicans: The 6-9 forward off the bench for New Orleans wants out and its willing to let him leave. His stats are good, 11.5 points and 5.9 rebounds, and he could've been had by the Wizards before this season started. Jones is on a minimum contract. His position isn't the greatest area of need for Washington, but he's better than some pieces currently not playing.  

[RELATED: Wall laughs off Westbrook moment]

No. 18 Virginia struggles against Miami, loses its fourth straight game

No. 18 Virginia struggles against Miami, loses its fourth straight game

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Bruce Brown made a 3-pointer with 23.8 seconds left in overtime, and Miami beat No. 18 Virginia 54-48 on Monday night for the Cavaliers fourth straight loss.

Brown scored 14 points to lead the Hurricanes (19-8, 9-6 Atlantic Coast Conference) to their third consecutive victory. Kamari Murphy and Dejan Vasiljevic added 10 points each.

Devon Hall scored 15 points to lead Virginia (18-9, 8-7), which last lost four straight in 2009-10, Tony Bennett's first season as coach. Isaiah Wilkins added 10 points and 10 rebounds, including two free throws with four seconds left in regulation to tie it.

Miami thought it had won when Davon Reed hit a 3-pointer at the end of the second half, but a video review was used to determine he released the ball just after the buzzer.

A putback by Marial Shayok with 39 seconds left gave the Cavaliers a 48-47 lead, but Brown made his only 3-pointer of the game on the Hurricanes' ensuing possession, and Miami sealed it at the free-throw line.

Both teams shot under 40 percent, with Virginia at just 31.4 percent, and it wasn't until Hall made a pair of free throws with 3:38 left in the second half that either team broke the 40-point mark. However, the Cavaliers were then scoreless until Wilkins made 1-of-1 on a trip to the line with just five seconds left in regulation. 

CSN Mid-Atlantic contributed to this report. 

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