Louisville joins ACC; UVA staying put?


Louisville joins ACC; UVA staying put?

Another week, another change to the Atlantic Coast Conference dance card. After founding member Maryland recently two-stepped its way to the Big Ten, the ACC once again sashayed over to the Big East for its latest addition, announcing on Wednesday that basketball-heavyweight Louisville would becomes the conference's 14th member. The Cardinals, coached on the hoops side by Rick Pitino, are the seventh program to bail on the once-mighty Big East conference in the last 18 months and the seventh to Big East school to joint the ACC since 2003-04.

Louisville reportedly beat out Connecticut and Cincinnati in the race to fill Maryland's vacated - and still warm - slot. However, don't think for a second the game of conference realignment musical chairs is over. The Big Ten, Southeastern Conference and Big 12 are all reportedly on the hunt for more schools, looking to swell its membership to 16 because this is how things are done these days. Super, gigantic, mega conferences or bust, so the mantra appears.

Various reports have the Big Ten eying other ACC schools including North Carolina, Georgia Tech and Virginia. In his attempt to tamp down any speculation, Virginia's Athletic Director Craig Littlepage issued a statement Tuesday night before the ACC school President's voted on the latest round of expansion.

"During the past week there have been numerous reports and rumors linking the University of Virginia to interest in membership in other athletic conferences,' Littlepage said. "Due to the recent changes that have taken place with conference realignment around the nation, I think it is important for us to put an end to this speculation as it relates to UVa.

"The University of Virginia is a proud member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. Neither representatives of the athletics department, nor President Teresa Sullivan, has received invitations to nor sought membership in other conferences. The ACC's commitment to its members and their student-athletes is the finest in the country. We look forward to continuing this relationship far into the future. Our goal is to continue supporting the ACC and its initiatives for long-term success.

"I have expressed this stance to ACC Commissioner John Swofford, and I want to take this opportunity to express that same commitment to our alumni, fans, supporters, student-athletes and coaches. We firmly stand behind the Atlantic Coast Conference."

North Carolina also made similar claims this week of wanting to stick with the ACC. We'll see about that. In the meantime, the ACC is suing Maryland following last week's conference changing announcement. Guess there are $50 million reasons why we knew this was coming. Getting Virginia and any other program thinking about jumping ship attention's, also a factor.

Back to Louisville. Considering the program's national championship hoops history and current Final Four contender status under Pitino, the swap with Maryland is hardly a downgrade (should Pitino return to his vagabond coaching roots and bail in the near future, and Mark Turgeon keep recruiting like his life depends on it, then we might have to revisit the exchange rate).

Obviously that's not the case with the television markets. Losing the Washington-Baltimore region is going to sting for the ACC, but Louisville represented the best of the remaining options (if Jim Calhoun remained in coaching perhaps Connecticut could have made such a claim). As for the football, kind of eh on both sides, though Louisville figures to have a greater chance for success in the ACC then Maryland will in the Big Ten.

Since 2003-04, seven schools have left the Big East for the ACC; Virginia Tech, Miami, Boston College, Syracuse, Pitt, Notre Dame (football only) and now, Louisville. Considering the final four names on that list remain in the Big East for now, the conference will have its own Big East-ACC challenge on an almost nightly basis. So, there's that.

Speaking of the Big East, the conference this week announced Tulane's addition as a full-time member with East Carolina joining for football only. Good luck with that.

College Football Playoff projections: Ohio State still controls its own destiny


College Football Playoff projections: Ohio State still controls its own destiny

No longer among the ranks of the unbeatens, Ohio State’s playoff chances certainly took a hit Saturday with their loss to Penn State.

But let’s not start digging their grave just yet.

Michigan now sits atop the Big Ten East standings, but they still have to finish the season with the big game against the Buckeyes. And it’s at Ohio State.


The truth is, if the Buckeyes win out, they still will win the Big Ten East and will have a chance to play (likely) either Nebraska or Wisconsin for the conference championship.

Will the committee really leave a one-loss Big Ten champion out of the playoff? Perhaps, if either Baylor or West Virginia remain undefeated, but if the winner of the Big 12 has at least one loss, it’s hard to see how either team would get in over Ohio State.

Again, assuming they win out, the Buckeyes will have beaten Oklahoma in Norman, Wisconsin in Madison, Nebraska, Michigan and the Big Ten West winner. Neither Baylor or West Virginia can match that resume.

So let’s not declare Ohio State’s playoff hopes done just yet. Their biggest challenge is likely rival Michigan, and the Wolverines have to travel to Columbus. That’s a very tough place to play, especially if you’re wearing maize and blue.

Will the Buckeyes ultimately reach the playoff despite their loss to Penn State? Who else will join them? Found out here in this week’s updated College Football Playoff projections.

Worth accounts for 5 TDs as No. 24 Navy beats Memphis

USA Today Sports

Worth accounts for 5 TDs as No. 24 Navy beats Memphis

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) -- Will Worth and No. 24 Navy played keep-away with Memphis while running the Tigers into the ground.

Worth rushed for a career-high 201 yards and three touchdowns, and the Midshipmen put on a dazzling display of ball control in a 42-28 victory Saturday.

In addition to operating the triple option in near-flawless fashion, Worth completed three of four passes for 85 yards and two scores.

"We take what we can get, and today, the quarterback run game was there," Worth said. "We could manage that and set up a couple of pass plays to be able to score through the air. It's just executing the game plan."

The last Navy player to reach the 200-yard mark on the ground was Keenan Reynolds in 2014.

Worth carried 31 times and orchestrated an attack that held the ball for nearly 40 minutes. That left high-scoring Memphis little time to counter-punch.

"It was kind of hard because we weren't doing a great job of getting off the field defensively," Tigers coach Mike Norvell said. "Offensively, it's hard to be in rhythm, it's hard to stay in rhythm."

The Midshipmen (5-1, 4-0 American Athletic Conference) gained a season-high 447 yards on the ground, averaging 6 yards per carry.

The victory put Navy in sole possession of first place in the AAC West and served as a suitable encore for its 46-40 upset of defending league champion Houston two weeks ago.

Navy's 14-game home winning streak is its longest at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium since the facility opened in 1959.

Tony Pollard returned a kickoff 100 yards and Riley Ferguson completed 25 of 40 passes for 333 yards and two touchdowns for Memphis (5-2, 2-1). But the Tigers simply couldn't score enough to offset the damage inflicted by Navy's sensational running attack.

"They kind of got after us up front and we had a couple of assignment issues," Norvell said. "But I just thought they did a great job executing."

Worth's second touchdown run put Navy ahead 28-14 early in the third quarter. Memphis responded with a 9-yard TD pass from Furguson to Daniel Hurd.

As the clock wound down in the third quarter, Navy faced a fourth-and-4 at the Memphis 18. Norvell called a timeout, forcing the Midshipmen to deal with the possibility of a field goal try into a stiff wind. Instead, Navy sent its offense on the field and went up 35-21 on a touchdown pass from Worth to Tyler Carmona .

After Memphis again got within a touchdown, a 52-yard completion by Worth led to a 32-yard field goal try by Bennett Moehring. The kick clanged off the left upright with 5:40 to go.

But a fumble by Tigers wide receiver Roderick Proctor was recovered by Navy with 3:39 remaining, and Worth clinched it with a 1-yard plunge.

Worth, a 6-foot-1 senior, started the season as a second-string quarterback but was elevated to starting status after Tago Smith injured his right knee in the opener.

"Here's a kid who was a backup, kept his mouth quiet," Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo said. "Now he's doing great things."


Memphis forced 18 turnovers in its first six games, but the only one it got Saturday was when Worth hit the pylon trying to score a touchdown and lost control of the ball. The result was a touchback for the Tigers, whose lone turnover -- Proctor's fumble -- was far most costly.


Memphis: The Tigers came in as a slight favorite because their offense hadn't scored fewer than 24 points in any game. But the defense wasn't up for the challenge of Navy's running attack, and now Memphis needs help to get to the AAC title game.

Navy: The Midshipmen have proven they don't need Reynolds at quarterback to make the triple option sing. Navy's running game is tricky, shifty and just about unstoppable for teams not accustomed to chasing the quarterback, fullback and slotback all over the field.


Memphis: The Tigers host Tulsa next Saturday night at the Liberty Bowl.

Navy: The Midshipmen face AAC East Division co-leader South Florida (6-2, 3-1) on the road Friday night.