Van Pelt leads AT&T National Round 1

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Van Pelt leads AT&T National Round 1

Len Shapiro
CSNwashington.com

With a shot holed out from the fairway for an eagle and another chip into the cup to save a precious par, Bo Van Pelt opened a one-shot lead after the first round of the AT&T National Thursday at steamy Congressional Country Club, where the heat is definitely on.

Temperatures are expected to keep rising into the high 90s over the remaining three days of the tournament, a year after the golf course also hosted the rain-soaked 2011 U.S. Open. Van Pelt opened that tournament with a round of 76 but rallied to get back to a tie for 14th, and said after his first round this week the course is surely playing more difficult now than it did a year ago.

Thats all you want out there right now for sure, said Van Pelt on a day when Congressional only yielded 22 sub-par rounds from the invitational field of 120 players. Jimmy Walker, who bogeyed his final hole when he missed a five-foot par-saving putt, was tied for second with veteran Vijay Singh and Virginia Tech graduate Brenden De Jonge, all at three-under 68.

The surprise name on a leader board that definitely did not include Tiger Woods (one-over 72), the tournaments host, was Billy Hurley III. The Leesburg native and Naval Academy graduate posted a two-under 69, leaving him tied for fifth at two-under 69.

Hurley had played his opening 17 holes without a bogey, but could not avoid one at his final hole, the 636-yard No. 9, when his wayward drive hit a tree and bounced over to the rough on the nearby fourth. He managed to loft a wedge over several tall trees to get back to the proper hole but laid up on his third shot. His fourth left him an 18-foot putt to save his par, but he was unable to convert.

Still, the 30-year-old who makes his home in Annapolis had few complaints about his day, not with so many friends and family pulling for him in the gallery.

Any time you play well, its fun, he said. But this is a heck of a golf course. You have to hit a lot of quality shots that end up with not a good look at birdie sometimes. I was patient out there, made a couple of putts early and then muddled it around and didnt make anything.

Hurley was paired in a group that included 17-year-old Beau Hossler, the high school senior-to-be from Mission Viejo, Cal., who became the darling of the U.S. Open galleries two weeks ago at Olympic in San Francisco when he trailed the lead by only four shots after 54 holes. He posted 76 in the final round that week and tied for 29th place, but his performance earned him a sponsors exemption here this week on the recommendation of Woods himself.

Hossler more than held his own Thursday. He was one-under going into his final hole, the ninth, but his three-foot putt to save par just caught the edge of the lip and spun out, leaving him with a three-putt bogey and an even-par total of 71, despite making four birdies.

I hit a lot of good shots (but) the ball seemed to be going a little bit longer than normal, so I was air-mailing some pins, he said. I had some great up-and-downs, but youve got to go out there and keep the ball below the hole, especially on this golf course, when the greens are this fast and.

As for the teenagers comfort level, not a problem.

Im starting to feel pretty comfortable out here, said Hossler, who played in the Open at Congressional a year ago at age 16 but missed the cut. Obviously my game needs to get better before Im out here all the time, but (it) feels like I can make the adjustment from junior to amateur to professional golf. Obviously I need to get more comfortable as the tournaments go on, but I feel like Ive made some progress.

Woods mostly felt frustrated with his round of one-over 72, leaving him tied for 30th place.

He was fortunate to post that score because he got a huge break on the difficult 11th hole when his tee shot hit a rock in a stream bank and caromed off into the rough instead of the water. He still made bogey there, made an 18-footer for birdie at the 14th and was fortunate to escape with one last bogey at the 15th.

From the middle of the fairway, he hit his second shot in the bunker at the 490-yard par 4, hit a weak sand shot that landed on the fringe, followed by a poor chip that left him with a tough eight-foot putt to save his bogey. He made the putt to avoid further disaster and parred in to stay within five shots of the lead.

I didnt hit it that bad today, Woods said. I just didnt get a lot out of my roundIts a pretty good grind out there. Not a lot of low scores on this golf course, especially this afternoon. It was baked out, the ball was springy and its hard to believe that four-under is leading.

A year ago, Rory McIlroy scorched the course with a record 16-under total to win his first Open title.

I think (Thursday) is a little retribution for last year, Woods said. Dont be mad at me. I didnt play.

Scherzer struggles to find consistency after loss to Cardinals

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Scherzer struggles to find consistency after loss to Cardinals

Consistency is much of what separates those who are good from those who are great and Nationals pitcher Max Scherzer is no stranger to the concept.

In each of the past three seasons he's pitched over 210 innings with ERAs at 3.15 or lower. He was an All-Star in each of those years and finished no worse than fifth in Cy Young voting.

With Scherzer, you usually know what you're going to get. High strikeouts, low walks and every once in a while an outing for the history books.

Yet through 11 starts in 2016, steadiness from start to start has eluded him. There's been something off, something missing that has left him with an uncharacteristically high 4.05 ERA and an MLB-high 15 homers allowed. 

Take his walks, for instance. Over his last six outings, Scherzer has alternated between walking zero batters and walking three or more. In Friday night's loss to the Cardinals, Scherzer walked four including one with the bases loaded to score a run. In his previous start he walked nobody in eight frames at the Mets.

One day he'll have it and then the next he just won't. 

"Of course I'm upset about the walks," Scherzer said after the Nats' 6-2 loss on Friday. "It seems like I keep walking the left-handed hitters. That's the bigger thing that will frustrate me more than the walks themselves."

The two most costly walks Scherzer issued on Friday came in the third inning, the frame he allowed five runs. Both of those walks - one to Greg Garcia and one to Matt Holliday - came in counts that began with two strikes. Holliday's was with the bases loaded and scored a run. It was the first time Scherzer walked in a run since April of 2013 and just the fourth time he's ever made that mistake.

"I'm not going to beat myself up over those because I was in 0-2 counts and I ended up walking them. It's more indicative that I just didn't have put-away pitches at that point," Scherzer said.

The walks that bothered Scherzer more did not lead to runs. Those were leadoff walks to begin the first and second innings.

"I'm actually more frustrated with the first two walks more than anything, because those can lead to dangerous innings where you have the leadoff walk," Scherzer said.

Friday night was the second time this season that Scherzer has allowed four walks. In 2015, he never walked four in a game. Through 11 starts Scherzer is already at 22 walks on the season after only giving up 34 total in 33 starts last season.

The walks are one thing for Scherzer. Homers are another. And it was again the longball that did Scherzer in on Friday, this time a grand slam by Stephen Piscotty in the third inning. It was just the second grand slam Scherzer has ever given up and his first since 2010.

Piscotty got a hanging slider and walloped it over the left field fence for his first career slam. 

"It was a dumb pitch," Scherzer admitted. "I hadn't shown my fastball yet and I threw another slider and I hung it. He put a good swing on it, ended in a blast."

It was part of a sequence of sliders Scherzer threw to Piscotty and he was waiting for it.

"Including the last at-bat he threw me four straight sliders. Luckily, I got that one," Piscotty said.

Scherzer has now allowed 42 homers over the last two seasons in 44 starts, more than any other pitcher. Since July 7 of 2015, Scherzer has given up 35 homers in 28 games. 

"I know I've been giving up a ton of home runs," Scherzer said. "But that one, that's just an execution thing. That's just me not throwing the right pitch at the right time with poor execution. So that's one where you don't beat yourself up over."

It has been a confusing season for Scherzer, but luckily for the Nats it hasn't hurt them much at all. They are tied for first place with the New York Mets and still boast one of baseball's best rotations with their other four holding ERAs at 2.87 or lower. 

Scherzer is their ace, but currently qualifies as their weakest link. While he searches for consistency from start to start, his teammates remain patient and point to his body of work as a whole.

"I'll take him out there any day," shortstop Danny Espinosa said. "He goes out and competes and tonight, just didn't have everything that he wanted."

"It's not how you start, it's how you finish," center fielder Ben Revere said. "With him, he's a pitcher who could finish strong. He'll definitely be big support for us coming down the stretch because he's one of our go-to guys. He's definitely our main guy. It's just one of those games that a couple pitches got away from him. Eventually it's going to come together and he'll be the Max Scherzer that we all know."

Jones leads off, Orioles break four-game losing streak

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Jones leads off, Orioles break four-game losing streak

CLEVELAND—Do the Orioles have a new leadoff hitter? For at least a few days, it’s Adam Jones. 

After four straight losses, and a boatload of strikeouts, manager Buck Showalter decided to bat Jones in the leadoff spot. 

Jones, who had been in a 3-for-39 slump, had three hits in five at-bats as the Orioles beat the Cleveland Indians 6-4 before 21,054 at Progressive Field on Friday night. 

Showalter says that it’s more than likely he’ll bat Jones in the leadoff spot again Saturday. For his first time there since May 10, 2010, Jones did well. 

“The problem when you do something like that, as a manager, what are you going to do tomorrow if he’s 0-for-5 with five punchouts? Where are you going? You always try to leave yourself a little bit of wiggle room,” Showalter said. 

When he was asked if he had made a decision on Saturday, Showalter deflected the question. 

“I hadn’t gotten that far. It’s been a while. Can I just kind of suck this one in a little. No, more than likely. I gave him four options today. Of course, I had already made out the lineup. We both picked the right one,” he said. 

In the previous three games, the Orioles struck out 52 times, and it was a relief to see only six K’s on the team’s scorecard. 

The Orioles’ first four-game losing streak of the season is over. 

“Well, the thing we’ve been focusing on the last four games is Ws and Ls,” Showalter said. “Everything else is, we’re trying to get to an end game of winning a game with the Orioles having more runs than they’ve got after nine innings.”

The Orioles (27-19) scored three runs in the first when Jones led off with a single up the middle. Hyun Soo Kim was hit by a Trevor Bauer pitch. Manny Machado’s single to center scored Jones. Chris Davis walked to load the bases. 

After Mark Trumbo and Nolan Reimold struck out, Jonathan Schoop’s single scored Kim and Machado to give Mike Wright a 3-0 cushion before he faced a batter. 

Wright gave up a run in the second on back-to-back doubles by Jose Ramirez and Juan Uribe. Mike Napoli hit a long home run, his ninth, in the fourth. 

Machado led off the fifth with a double to center, but he unwisely tried to make it a triple when the ball escaped Rajai Davis. Davis’ throw nabbed Machado, and Reimold’s single was wasted. 

Wright didn’t make it out of the fifth. Chris Gimenez began the inning with a walk, Davis singled, and Carlos Santana walked to load the bases with none out. After Jason Kipnis struck out, Francisco Lindor’s fly to right scored Gimenez to tie the game at 3, and Dylan Bundy replaced Wright. 

“It was terrible. When you score three in the first, you should shut out, shut out, shut out, every inning after that. I should never walk anybody. I should continue to be aggressive,” Wright said. 

Bundy (1-1) got four outs for his first major league win, nearly three years after his June 2013 Tommy John surgery. 

“It’s taken four years I guess to get to that point, but it’s still exciting. I actually didn’t know I got the win until some of the teammates told me in the clubhouse, so it was fun,” Bundy said. 

In the seventh, Machado doubled and scored when Davis doubled. Trumbo hit an opposite field home run to right off Zach McAllister (2-2), and the Orioles had a 6-3 lead. 

Brad Brach pitched a scoreless seventh, but Lindor led off the eighth with his fourth home run off Darren O’Day to cut the lead to 6-4. 

After the home run, Napoli walked, Ramirez doubled, and Uribe struck out. Lonnie Chisenhall was walked intentionally to load the bases, and Gimenez hit a ball that looked as if it was going to right field, but Schoop snared it, and threw to Machado to begin the artful double play that ended the eighth for Cleveland (25-21).

Zach Britton earned his 13th save with a scoreless ninth. 

The losing streak is over, and mass strikeouts were averted. 

“We’re not afraid to strike out. They’re going to come. More than that, it was some of the pitches we took and gave ourselves another chance to get a better pitch to hit, and I think when we did get something to work with, we put it in play and found some holes, too,” Trumbo said. 

NOTES: Machado has 19 doubles. … O’Day has allowed four home runs so far this season, one below his total for the entire 2016 season. … Ubaldo Jimenez (2-5, 6.04) faces Danny Salazar (4-3, 2.32) on Saturday afternoon at 4:10 p.m. 

RELATED: SHOWALTER NOT SURE HOW LONG HARDY WILL BE OUT

Scherzer gives up grand slam as Nationals fall to Cardinals

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Scherzer gives up grand slam as Nationals fall to Cardinals

Postgame analysis of the Nats' 6-2 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals on Friday night at Nationals Park.

How it happened: Max Scherzer's play this season continues to be an outlier both for the Nationals' 2016 rotation and within the context of his career. The former Cy Young winner put in yet another uncharacteristic outing on Friday night, not only losing command of the strike zone, but issuing runs in a fashion you just don't see often from the Nationals' ace.

Scherzer gave up five runs in total to the Cardinals on Friday and four of them came on a grand slam by Stephen Piscotty. It was just the second grand slam Scherzer has ever allowed and the first since 2010. Scherzer also walked in a runner with the bases loaded for just the fourth time in his nine MLB seasons.

Those two plays happened in back-to-back at-bats. You just don't see that very often.

The Nationals' unbeaten record against St. Louis was broken with the 6-2 loss, the fourth defeat for the Nats in their last seven contests. The Nationals are now an even .500 at 13-13 in the month of May.

What it means: The loss doesn't mean much in the grand scheme of things, but Scherzer's season remains a concern. Things could be worse, of course, but he has clearly been the weakest link in their rotation so far. It's unexpected and the Nats are fortunate the rest of their starting group has otherwise been so good. Even with Scherzer's 4.05 ERA, the Nats rank second in baseball as a rotation in the category. This is the latest Scherzer has held an ERA above 4.00 since 2012 and after his 11th start, it's no longer early.

Homer, walks do Scherzer in: Six of the seven innings Scherzer threw were scoreless and he allowed only three hits, but a disastrous third inning was all it took to ruin his Frday night. Scherzer first ran into trouble by giving up a one-out single to pitcher Jaime Garcia. He then walked Greg Garcia, allowed a single to Aledmys Diaz and then a walk to Matt Holliday to bring in a run. It was the first time since April 24, 2013 that Scherzer has walked in a run. The next at-bat was Piscotty's grand slam, a towering shot to left field off a slider. Scherzer has allowed a league-high 15 homers this season. No pitcher has given up more than the 42 bombs he's surrendered since the start of 2015. It was also the second time Scherzer has allowed four walks this season. He didn't walk four batters in a game all of 2015. Over his last six starts, Scherzer has alternated between zero walk outings and ones where he issues three or more. It's a strange trend that even he probably can't explain.

Espinosa homers again: Danny Espinosa homered for the second straight night and now has five on the season. He has four homers in May. He also had four homers last May, more than any other month in 2015. His career-high is eight set back in May of 2011. Espinosa likes hitting homers in May, apparently. 

Murphy ties hits record: Daniel Murphy got another hit in this one, a single to left field in the sixth inning. That gave him 40 in May, which tied a Nationals record for hits in a single month. Denard Span also had 40 hits in August of 2014. Murphy has four more games left in May to break it. The odds are pretty good he'll end up closer to 50 than he will 40 with the way he's been playing. The record for hits in one month, by the way, is held by Ty Cobb. He had 68 in July of 1912. Murphy's been good, but he isn't getting anywhere close to that.

Up next: The Nationals and Cardinals continue their series with a 7:15 p.m. first pitch on Saturday night. Gio Gonzalez (3-2, 2.87) will square off with Adam Wainwright (4-3, 5.77) in a rematch of Game 5 of the 2012 NLDS.