Who else can we ask about Strasburg?

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Who else can we ask about Strasburg?

With the shutdown of Stephen Strasburg getting closer by the day, it seems we are running out of people to ask of their opinions about it. Everyone from Nats general manager Mike Rizzo himself to ESPN's Dick Vitale has weighed in on the issue, even Denny McLain, the former big leaguer turned convict, had something to say about it on Thursday. While it looks like there is no one else left to ask, we came up with a list of those who haven't been. Some are serious, some not so much.
Serious:Bud Selig
The MLB commissioner hasnt spoken out on the issue (as far as we know), but no one would be better to answer whether shutting down Strasburg is either good or bad for baseball. It would be interesting to see if he would care more about the draw Strasburg could be in playoff games this season or his potential stardom for years to come.

Frank Jobe

The inventor of Tommy John surgery, Jobe actually performed the original procedure on John in 1974. At the time he declared the odds of recovery at 1 in 100 and that number has since risen to nearly 90. As someone who has seen the surgery develop into the rate of success it has today, he may have thoughts on the best way to recover from it nowadays.

Jake Delhomme

Believe it or not, Delhomme actually had Tommy John surgery in 2008. Yes, he plays a different sport, but Delhommes career was affected greatly by the procedure. He was never quite the same player and could speak to the difficulty of rehabbing from the surgery.

Kinda, sorta serious:Deion Sanders

Believe it or not, Sanders actually also had Tommy John surgery. Nothing a cornerback does is really that similar to a pitcher, but at least he would be more qualified to speak on the issue than Terry Bradshaw.

The Surgeon General

The Surgeon General, currently Regina Benjamin, is the nations leading spokesman on matters of public health as described on a government website. If doctors who have performed the surgery before have weighed in, maybe she can give the final say?

Joe Gibbs

Gibbs was asked about the shut down on ESPN Radio last month, but dodged the question. He isn't exactly qualified to give an expert opinion or anything, probably the reason he declined to answer, but Gibbs still holds a lot of clout in the area and knows winning better than any sports figure in the city's history.
Not so serious:Ja Rule

In a standup show, Dave Chappelle famously made fun of MTV asking Ja Rule for his input after September 11th. Maybe someone could get in touch with him? Oh, hes in prison? Nevermind.

An empty chair

But only if Clint Eastwood asks the question. It seemed that chair had a lot to say, maybe it has an opinion on the matter.

Vinny Cerrato

Not looked back on as the greatest general manger in Washington, D.C. sports history, Cerrato had a poor track record in the draft and signed some of the worst contracts in NFL history (see Haynesworth, Albert). Maybe it would be worth asking his opinion and then doing the exact opposite of what he says.

Scherzer rebounds as Nats complete sweep of Cardinals

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Scherzer rebounds as Nats complete sweep of Cardinals

Postgame analysis of the Nats' 6-1 win over the St. Louis Cardinals on Sunday afternoon at Busch Stadium: 

How it happened: Apparently all the Nationals and Max Scherzer needed to break out of their early season slump was to play on the road against a team that won 100 games the year before. 

Just like the Nationals' bats did in the two days prior, Scherzer found his groove in St. Louis on Sunday with seven shutout innings and zero walks in his best start of the season. The Nats' lineup got to Cardinals phenom Carlos Martinez late in his outing and Clint Robinson, Danny Espinosa and Chris Heisey homered as the Nats beat St. Louis 6-1 to secure their first sweep of the Cardinals since 2007 and their first ever sweep at Busch Stadium.

What it means: The Nats have considerable momentum with a three-game winning streak and a club record 17-7 start as they head to Kansas City to face the Royals. Playing the defending champs looked much more daunting before this weekend than it does now, as the Nats head to K.C. once again looking like one of the best teams in baseball.

Scherzer bounces back: Seeing Scherzer turn things around is a very positive sign for the Nationals who were waiting for their ace to fall in line with the rest of their rotation. Scherzer finally overcame his first inning woes to set the tone for a strong start overall. He escaped the first inning without allowing a run for just the second time in six starts this season. He ended up going seven shutout frames with nine strikeouts, zero walks and four hits allowed on 105 pitches. The right-hander dropped his season ERA all the way down to 3.55 as he now turns his attention to the Cubs whom he'll face in his next start at Wrigley Field.

Martinez cracks late: Martinez was locked in from the very first pitch and didn't allow a hit until Scherzer singled (one of his two hits on Sunday) with two outs in the third. Martinez was firing 98 mile per hour heat with a dazzling curveball to complement. The right-hander finally gave up a run in the sixth on a Matt den Dekker single and then served up back-to-back bombs to Robinson and Espinosa in the seventh. It took three times through their order, but the Nats figured out Martinez on this particular day. Espinosa, by the way, has two homers in his last three games.

Harper gets a Golden Sombrero: Mired in his first real slump of the season, Bryce Harper had major trouble against Martinez and the Cardinals. The Nats' slugger went 0-for-4 with four strikeouts on Sunday and is now hitless in his last 14 at-bats. Harper has just one hit in his last five games (17 ABs) and is now hitting .272 on the season. 

Robinson's homer much-needed: Robinson earned a bench spot out of spring training after a breakout campaign in 2015, but the first baseman has been slow to heat up this season so far. He was just 1-for-21 on the year before his seventh inning homer. The homer, though, could be just what Robinson needs to get going. It was a two-run shot and it came off one of the NL's hottest pitchers.

Up next: The Nationals move on to Kansas City to take on the defending World Series champions in three games at Kauffman Stadium. Monday night is an 8:15 p.m. first pitch with Gio Gonzalez (1-1, 1.42) and Edinson Volquez (3-1, 3.34) set to start.

Wilson Ramos returns to Nationals, Severino sent to minors

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Wilson Ramos returns to Nationals, Severino sent to minors

Catcher Wilson Ramos has returned to the Nationals after spending five days on MLB's bereavement list due to the death of his grandfather Jesus Campos. Catcher Pedro Severino was sent back to Triple-A Syracuse to make room for Ramos.

Ramos, 28, returns to the Nats with a .316 average, two homers and eight RBI in 15 games this season. He has the second-best average on the team this season behind second baseman Daniel Murphy.

Ramos left the Nationals on April 26 after hearing of his grandfather's death. The Nationals' lineup struggled initially with Ramos out, but has since recovered to score 11 runs in their first two games at the St. Louis Cardinals. Ramos is not in the lineup Sunday as the Nats aim for a sweep.

Jose Lobaton has been filling in most for Ramos and on Monday Gio Gonzalez is set to pitch. Lobaton has caught Gonzalez exclusively so far this season.

Ramos caught Gonzalez 11 times last season out of 30 total starts. The combo produced a 4.52 ERA in 61 2/3 innings. Gonzalez held a 3.39 mark in 114 innings with Lobaton.

Gio has worked mostly with Lobaton since the catcher was acquired by the Nats before the 2014 season, but has been very good with both catchers in his career. He holds a career 3.25 ERA and .241 BAA with Lobaton and a 3.42 ERA and .247 BAA with Ramos.

NL East: Marlins' Stanton hit scoreboard with HR at Brewers' stadium

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NL East: Marlins' Stanton hit scoreboard with HR at Brewers' stadium

Giancarlo Stanton blasted a 462-foot homer on Saturday at Miller Park, the second-longest home run any player has hit so far this season.

This particular shot bounced off the massive scoreboard in center field in Milwaukee. Stanton knew he had it as soon as it left the bat. 

According to MLB's StatCast, the ball left Stanton's bat at a speed of 116.8 miles per hour. The only homer hit this season with an exit velocity of 117 or higher was by Carlos Gonzalez of the Rockies.

Check out Stanton's bomb: