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Orioles avoid arbitration with Wieters, 3 others

Orioles avoid arbitration with Wieters, 3 others

BALTIMORE (AP) The Baltimore Orioles agreed to one-year contracts Friday with catcher Matt Wieters, slugger Chris Davis and left-handed pitchers Brian Matusz and Troy Patton.

The moves enabled the sides to avoid arbitration.

Wieters, who received $500,000 in 2012, earned a raise to $5.5 million. He made the AL All-Star team last season and finished with a .249 batting average while setting career highs with 23 homers, 83 RBIs and 144 games played.

Davis led the Orioles with 33 home runs and 85 RBIs while playing the outfield, first base and designated hitter. His salary jumped from $488,000 to $3.3 million.

Matusz contributed in the bullpen during the 2012 playoffs. In 18 relief appearances during the regular season, the 25-year-old was 1-0 with a 1.35 ERA. He will receive $1.6 million in 2013 after making $1.45 million a year ago.

Patton was 1-0 with a 2.43 ERA in 54 games with Baltimore. His salary will jump to $815,000 from $483,500.

The Orioles also exchanged arbitration figures with All-Star closer Jim Johnson and right-handers Jason Hammel and Darren O'Day.

Johnson requested $7.1 million while Baltimore countered at $5.7 million. Hammel asked for $8.25 million and was offered $5.7 million. O'Day proposed $3.2 million and was offered $1.8 million.

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Big home run season earns Comeback Player award for Trumbo

Big home run season earns Comeback Player award for Trumbo

Mark Trumbo, who led the major leagues in home runs with 47, has been voted the American League’s Comeback Player of the Year by The Sporting News. 

Trumbo, who will be a highly coveted free agent, drove in 108 runs and batted .256 in his first—and perhaps only season with the Orioles.

He was obtained from Seattle last December. In 2015, Trumbo hit 22 homers and 64 RBIs with the Mariners and Arizona Diamondbacks. 

Trumbo beat out former Nationals shortstop Ian Desmond, who had a fine year with Texas by one vote, 40-39. 

Boston’s Rick Porcello, who is a strong contender for the AL Cy Young Award, finished third with 28 votes. 

Chris Tillman received four votes. 

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An intriguing World Series: Underrated Indians challenge skilled Cubs

An intriguing World Series: Underrated Indians challenge skilled Cubs

The Chicago Cubs won 103 games in the regular season, scoring a tick under five runs per game and allowing 3.4. 

Their fifth best pitcher, Jason Hammel, won 15 games, and hasn’t been on the postseason roster, and they missed an exciting young power hitter, Kyle Schwarber, who played just two games before suffering what was thought to be a season-ending knee injury. 

After two games in the Arizona Fall League, Schwarber is back for the World Series joining a group of exciting young players: Javier Baez, Kris Bryant, Willson Contreras, Anthony Rizzo and Addison Russell. 

Besides these excellent position players, the Cubs have accomplished veteran pitchers. They start with Jon Lester, who’ll be pitching in his 20th postseason game tonight. He has a 2.50 ERA in postseason play. 

Jake Arrieta, Kyle Hendricks and John Lackey follow. Lackey has pitched in even more postseason games than Lester, 25, and his ERA is 3.26. 

Their closer is the ferocious Aroldis Chapman, who in one of his final games with the Yankees before he was traded to the Cubs in late July, threw a 105 mph pitch against the Orioles. 

Do the Cubs have any weaknesses? Yes, they were just 22-23 in one-run games. They fell into a horrible slump when they were shut out in the second and third games of the NLCS, but when they were challenged, they rose up. 

It was only a week ago when after the Dodgers shut them out and they fell behind 2-1 in the NLCS that many worried. Quickly, they recovered and polished off Los Angeles by a combined score of 23-6 in the final three games. 

After they took a 2-0 lead in the Division Series against the Giants, they lost a 13-inning struggle, worrying their fans. When they trailed by three runs heading into the ninth in the fourth game, there was panic—by not by the Cubs. 

A four-run rally won them the game and the Division. 

In a poll of ESPN baseball writers and broadcasters, 26 of 32 picked the Cubs. 

Before I add my endorsement, some words about Chicago’s worthy challenger. 

A World Series matchup is always intriguing, but because of the long arid period for each franchise, it’s even more so. 

Making the World Series for the first time in 71 years won’t be good enough for the Cubs, but it’s interesting that despite all the talk about how hungry their city is for a winner, the White Sox 2005 title is forgotten. 

Of course, the White Sox are hardly as popular as the Cubs, and they haven’t been the postseason since 2008.

US Cellular Field is no Wrigley Field, but neither is Cleveland’s Progressive Field. 

Cleveland’s postseason angst was relieved by LeBron James in June when the Cavaliers beat the Golden State Warriors, and while they haven’t won a World Series since 1948, they did get there in 1995 and 1997. 

The Indians have had a marvelous postseason, beating the Red Sox in three games in the Division Series and overcoming Toronto in five games in the ALCS.

Opposing Lester tonight is one of baseball’s most underappreciated pitchers, Cory Kluber, who won the Cy Young Award in 2014 and will get some votes for it this year. 

The Indians have a terrific young shortstop, Francisco Lindor, and a third baseman, Jose Ramirez, who no one knows, but should. 

In Mike Napoli, Cleveland has one of the most durable and least recognized postseason players of our time. Napoli, who will be 35 on Halloween, set career highs in home runs (34) and RBIs (101).

Did you know Napoli is playing for his eighth postseason team in 11 seasons? 

In 2011, Napoli drove in 10 runs and batted .350 in Texas’ seven-game loss to St. Louis. 

The Indians’ starters were excellent during the regular season, but one of them, Carlos Carrasco is missing this postseason, and another, Danny Salazar may only be available on a restricted basis. 

Somehow, Cleveland got through the Trevor Bauer drone incident without incident, and got to the World Series.

It was Terry Francona’s inventive use of the bullpen, starring three relievers with WHIPs of 1 or below: Cody Allen (1.000), Dan Otero (.0906), and of course, Andrew Miller (.0552).

In 20 postseason innings, Miller has not allowed a run and just six hits. He’s walked three and struck out 31. His postseason WHIP is .0450. 

Miller will be used early and often by Francona, who swept two World Series with Boston in 2004 and 2007. 

The Indians will give the Cubs a challenge, but again Chicago will prevail. They’re just too deep and too skilled for an underrated Indians team. 

Cubs in six. 

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