Quick Links

Fiery Orioles manager Earl Weaver dead at 82

201301190925339224748-p2.jpeg

Fiery Orioles manager Earl Weaver dead at 82

BALTIMORE (AP) Loved in Baltimore long after he ended his Hall of Fame career, Earl Weaver remained an Oriole to the end.

The notoriously peppery Hall of Fame manager died at age 82 on a Caribbean cruise associated with the Orioles, his marketing agent said Saturday.

The Duke of Earl, as he was affectionately known in Baltimore, took the Orioles to the World Series four times over 17 seasons but won only one title, in 1970. His .583 winning percentage ranks fifth among managers who served 10 or more seasons in the 20th century.

Dick Gordon said Weaver's wife told him that Weaver went back to his cabin after dinner and began choking between 10:30 and 11 Friday night. Gordon said a cause of death has not been determined.

``It's a sad day. Earl was a terrific manager,'' Vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette said. ``The simplicity and clarity of his leadership and his passion for baseball was unmatched. He's a treasure for the Orioles. He leaves a terrific legacy of winning baseball with the Orioles and we're so grateful for his contribution. He has a legacy that will live on,''

Weaver will forever remain a part of Camden Yards. A statue of him was dedicated last summer in the stadium's flag court, along with the rest of the team's Hall of Fame members.

``Earl Weaver stands alone as the greatest manager in the history of the Orioles organization and one of the greatest in the history of baseball,'' Orioles owner Peter Angelos said. ``This is a sad day for everyone who knew him and for all Orioles fans. Earl made his passion for the Orioles known both on and off the field. On behalf of the Orioles, I extend my condolences to his wife, Marianna, and to his family.''

Weaver was a salty-tongued manager who preferred to wait for a three-run homer rather than manufacture a run with a stolen base or a bunt. While some baseball purists argued that strategy, no one could dispute the results.

``Earl was well known for being one of the game's most colorful characters with a memorable wit, but he was also amongst its most loyal,'' Commissioner Bud Selig said. ``On behalf of Major League Baseball, I send my deepest condolences to his wife, Marianne, their family and all Orioles fans.''

Weaver had a reputation as a winner, but umpires knew him as a hothead. Weaver would often turn his hat backward and yell directly into an umpire's face to argue a call or a rule, and after the inevitable ejection he would more often than not kick dirt on home plate or on the umpire's shoes.

``He was an intense competitor and smart as a whip when it comes to figuring out ways to beat you,'' said Davey Johnson, who played under Weaver in the minor leagues and with the Orioles from 1965 to 1972.

He was ejected 91 times, including once in both games of a doubleheader.

Asked once if his reputation might have harmed his chances to gain entry into the Hall of Fame, Weaver admitted, ``It probably hurt me.''

Not for long. He entered the hall in 1996.

``When you discuss our game's motivational masters, Earl is a part of that conversation,'' Baseball Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson said. ``He was a proven leader in the dugout and loved being a Hall of Famer. Though small in stature, he was a giant as a manager.''

His ejections were overshadowed by his five 100-win seasons, six AL East titles and four pennants. Weaver was inducted 10 years after he managed his final game with Baltimore at the end of an ill-advised comeback.

In 1985, the Orioles' owner at the time, Edward B. Williams, coaxed Weaver away from golf to take over a struggling squad. Weaver donned his uniform No. 4, which had already been retired by the team, and tried to breathe some life into the listless Orioles.

Baltimore went 53-52 over the last half of the 1985 season, but finished seventh in 1986 with a 73-89 record. It was Weaver's only losing season as a major-league manager, and he retired for good after that.

``If I hadn't come back,'' Weaver said after his final game, ``I would be home thinking what it would have been like to manage again. I found out it's work.''

Weaver finished with a 1,480-1,060 record. He won Manager of the Year three times.

``I had a successful career, not necessarily a Hall of Fame career, but a successful one,'' he said.

Weaver came to the Orioles as a first base coach in 1968, took over as manager on July 11 and went on to become the winningest manager in the history of the franchise.

``Earl was such a big part of Orioles baseball and personally he was a very important part of my life and career and a great friend to our family,'' Hall of Fame shortstop Cal Ripken said. ``His passion for the game and the fire with which he managed will always be remembered by baseball fans everywhere and certainly by all of us who had the great opportunity to play for him. Earl will be missed but he can't and won't be forgotten.''

He knew almost everything about the game. He was also a great judge of human character, and that's one of the main reasons why he was loved by a vast majority of his players even though he often rode them mercilessly from spring training into October.

``His bark was worse than his bite, but you had to know him and kind of grow up with him, and then you loved him like a father,'' Johnson said. ``He was a used-car salesman in the minor leagues during the offseason, so he learned a lot of ways to sell you on just about anything.''

Pat Dobson, who pitched two seasons under Weaver, said, ``Certainly, the years I played for him were the two most enjoyable years I've had.''

During games Weaver smoked cigarettes in the tunnel leading to the dugout and he never kicked the habit. He suffered a mild heart attack in August 1998, and the Orioles' manager at the time, Ray Miller, wondered aloud how his mentor was holding up.

``I wouldn't want to talk to him if he hasn't had a cigarette in 10 days,'' Miller joked. ``They've probably got him tied to a chair.''

Weaver was a brilliant manager, but he never made it to the majors as a player. He finally quit after spending 13 years as a second baseman in the St. Louis organization.

``He talked about how he could drive in 100 runs a year, score 100 runs and never make an error,'' Johnson said. ``He said he never got to the big leagues because the Cardinals had too many good players in front of him.''

Quick Links

Orioles try and avoid series loss with Dylan Bundy starting

Orioles try and avoid series loss with Dylan Bundy starting

Tonight's Game: Colorado Rockies (48-52) vs. Baltimore Orioles (58-41), Oriole Park at Camden Yards, Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.

Starting pitchers: Jon Gray (6-4, 4.12) vs. Dylan Bundy (3-2, 3.30)

Keys to the Game:

Can the Orioles avoid losing just their second home series of the season. They're 12-1-3 in home series. 

Can Bundy win for the second time as a starter? Last Friday, he pitched five innings, allowing just one unearned run.

News and Notes:

The Orioles lead the American League East by two games over Toronto. Boston is 2 1/2 games behind.

Chris Davis is stuck in an 0-for-24 slump. 

Gray is 2-1 with a 2.70 ERA in his past five outings. 

The Orioles are 6-3 in interleague play. 

Adam Jones has walked 27 times, nine away from his career high.

Quick Links

Tillman's rough start leads to the end of Orioles' five-game win streak

Tillman's rough start leads to the end of Orioles' five-game win streak

BALTIMORE—Chris Tillman had been magnificent. In his previous four starts, Tillman allowed four runs in 28 innings and won all four. 

On Tuesday night, Tillman gave up four runs in the third inning alone. 

Tillman’s search for his 15th win will have to wait at least another five days as the Orioles’ five-game winning streak came to an end in the Colorado Rockies’ 6-3 win before 23,677 at Oriole Park. 

After learning he hadn’t been selected to the All-Star Game, Tillman reeled off four straight wins. Those wins came just after three of his poorest starts of the season. 

Now, he can start on a new streak. 

The Rockies (48-52) scored four runs on five hits in the third, all on two-strike hits. 

Carlos Gonzalez had a two-run double and Trevor Story a two-run single. 

“Any situation you get in like that, long innings, you always feel like you’re one or two pitches away. I felt like we made a lot of good pitches that inning, made some pitches to get some outs, but you’ve got to give credit to them. They put some huge at-bats together, made some really good swings and I wouldn’t change a thing that inning. I missed with a couple but also made some really good pitches at the same time,” Tillman said. 

“We’ve talked about this before. When you’re getting in pitchers counts and not putting guys away, it’s frustrating, but you’ve got to go back and look at the positives. You got to two strikes and you’ve just got to find a way to put them away.”

Two more runs scored against Tillman (14-3) in the fifth on an RBI double by Nolan Arenado and a wild pitch by Tillman. 

“Chris, the pitches he elevated they didn’t miss. Very close to a better outing, he got through five. We just didn’t do much offensively,” manager Buck Showalter said. 

Tillman was lifted after five and replaced by Tyler Wilson, who was given a reprieve before game time. Wilson, who was summoned when Ubaldo Jimenez went on the paternity list, was kept on when he returned. He threw four perfect innings. 

The Orioles (58-41), who suffered a rare home loss, decided to keep 13 pitchers for now and jettisoned outfielder Julio Borbon instead. 

With the loss, the Orioles are still a gaudy 37-15. They had won a season-high six straight at home. Their fifth winning streak of five or more games overall came to an end. 

Colorado started Chad Bettis (9-6). On Aug. 17, 2013, Bettis allowed eight runs—six of them unearned—in 2 2/3 innings in Baltimore. 

Bettis was much sharper in his second outing against the Orioles. He allowed two runs, on an Adam Jones’ two-run home run in the fifth inning, and just four hits in six innings. 

The Orioles trimmed the lead to 6-3 in the eighth. Scott Oberg walked Jones, who took second on Hyun Soo Kim’s infield out and third on Manny Machado’s single. 

Boone Logan struck out Chris Davis, who is now 0-for-23, and threw a wild pitch to score Jones. Mark Trumbo popped out to end the eighth. 

There have been a number of similar streaks for Davis in his Orioles career, and it always seems as if they end with a barrage of home runs.

“He’s going through a period where he’s not stating the obvious- doing what he’s capable of,” Showalter said. “You got to stick with him and trust the track record. He’s frustrated with it, believe me. He’s here early. Sometimes you can try too hard. I know how bad he wants to be the contributor he’s capable of being.”

Carlos Estevez pitched the ninth for his ninth save.

While Davis isn’t swinging well, Adam Jones is playing well. He’s either scored or driven in all six Orioles runs this series. 

He walked twice and now has 27 bases on balls this season, nine away from his career high. 

“No, I have not changed as a hitter. I just, I don’t know, man. I still think I swing a lot, and I still think I swing out of the zone a lot. I’ll take the walks if 3-2 is really outside or in or up or down. It just has to be something I really can’t reach for me to take it,” Jones said. 

NOTES: Kim was 1-for-3 in his first game since July 10. He was on the disabled list with a strained right hamstring. “I felt good that I’m heading in the right direction. I’m trying to find the right mechanics to be in the ballgame again,” Kim said through his translator. …The Orioles end their homestand on Wednesday night. Jon Gray (6-4, 4.12) faces Dylan Bundy (3-2, 3.30). … Jimenez will start at Minnesota on Thursday night. 

RELATED: BACK FROM PATERNITY LEAVE, JIMENEZ EAGER TO GET BACK ON MOUND

Quick Links

Back from 'tiring' paternity leave, Jimenez eager to pitch again

Back from 'tiring' paternity leave, Jimenez eager to pitch again

BALTIMORE—Ubaldo Jimenez is back with the Orioles. His wife, Marivi, delivered the couple’s first child, a daughter named Jimevi on Saturday night. 

“It feels good. It was a wonderful experience for me to be part of. It’s something that you only get your first daughter once. But it’s good to be back. Those three days took a long time,” Jimenez said.

His wife gave birth a few weeks ahead of schedule. 

“It’s been pretty rough. You never know what’s going to happen when your wife goes into labor. You have to wait a long time and there’s a lot of things you aren’t sure about, especially doing it for the first times. It’s tiring, you don’t sleep a lot. But it’s a wonderful experience. 
 
Jimenez said that while he’s been on paternity leave, he’s snuck in a couple of bullpen sessions. Manager Buck Showalter has said that Jimenez could start on Thursday in Minnesota, but Jimenez doesn’t know anything about it.  

“They haven’t told me. But if they give me the chance of course I’m going to be happy to hopefully be there for the team and give them a chance to win,” Jimenez said. 

He hasn’t pitched since July 8, an extraordinarily long layoff.

“It has to be tough, I’ve never been through it before. Where I had to go two weeks without pitching. But it’s part of the game, I’ve been staying in shape, throwing bullpens. It’s not going to be that bad,” Jimenez said. 

While Jimenez was on the paternity list, his name was circulating in rumors involving a proposed trade with the San Diego Padres involving Melvin Upton, Jr. The Padres traded Upton to Toronto instead.

“I didn’t have a lot of time to be following that. I had my daughter. That was the No. 1 thing at the time. You know, rumors are going to be rumored. If something is going to happen, you never know. You have to be ready for whenever, but I’m part of the team and I’m looking forward to being there,” Jimenez said.