Baseball reflects on HOF pair Weaver, Musial

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Baseball reflects on HOF pair Weaver, Musial

One was born in St. Louis, the other became a star there.

Aside from that, Earl Weaver and Stan Musial were about as different as two Hall of Famers could be.

``Talk about your odd couple,'' said George Vecsey, the longtime sports columnist for The New York Times who wrote a recent biography of Musial.

Weaver was a 5-foot-6 rabble rouser whose penchant for quarreling with umpires belied a cerebral approach to managing that has stood the test of time. Musial was a humble slugger with a funky batting stance who was beloved by Cardinals fans and respected by pretty much everyone else.

Saturday began with news of Weaver's death at age 82, and by the end of the night Musial had died, too, leaving baseball to reflect on two distinguished careers rich in contrasts.

``Earl was well known for being one of the game's most colorful characters with a memorable wit, but he was also amongst its most loyal,'' Commissioner Bud Selig said.

Selig later released a statement after Musial's death at age 92.

``Stan's life embodies baseball's unparalleled history and why this game is the national pastime. As remarkable as `Stan the Man' was on the field, he was a true gentleman in life,'' Selig said.

A three-time MVP and seven-time National League batting champion, Musial helped the Cardinals win three World Series championships in the 1940s. His popularity in St. Louis can be measured by the not one, but two statues that stand in his honor outside Busch Stadium. After his death Saturday, Cardinals of more recent vintage began offering condolences almost immediately.

``Sad to hear about Stan the Man, it's an honor to wear the same uniform,'' said a message posted on the Twitter account of Cardinals outfielder Matt Holliday.

Albert Pujols, who led St. Louis to World Series titles in 2006 and 2011 before leaving as a free agent before last season, offered prayers for Musial's family via Twitter.

``I will cherish my friendship with Stan for as long as I live,'' said a message posted on Pujols' site. ``Rest in Peace.''

Weaver was born in St. Louis, but his greatest success came as a manager in Baltimore. He took the Orioles to the World Series four times, winning one title in 1970.

Never a fan of small-ball strategies like bunting and stealing bases, Weaver preferred to wait for a three-run homer, always hoping for a big inning that could break the game open.

``No one managed a ballclub or pitching staff better than Earl,'' said Davey Johnson, who played under Weaver with the Orioles.

Johnson now manages the Washington Nationals and ran the Orioles from 1996-97.

``He was decades ahead of his time,'' Johnson said. ``Not a game goes by that I don't draw on something Earl did or said. I will miss him every day.''

While Musial could let his bat do the talking, Weaver was more than willing to shout to be heard. His salty-tongued arguing with umpires will live on through YouTube, and Orioles programs sold at the old Memorial Stadium frequently featured photos of Weaver squabbling.

Former umpire Don Denkinger remembered a game in which the manager disputed a call with Larry McCoy at the plate.

``Earl tells us, `Now I'm gonna show you how stupid you all are.' Earl goes down to first base and ejects the first base umpire. Then he goes to second base and ejects the second base umpire. I'm working third base and now he comes down and ejects me,'' Denkinger said.

Musial was a quieter type who spent his career far removed from the bright lights of places like New York and Boston. But his hitting exploits were certainly on par with contemporaries Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams.

``I knew Stan very well. He used to take care of me at All-Star games, 24 of them,'' Hall of Famer Willie Mays said. ``He was a true gentleman who understood the race thing and did all he could. Again, a true gentleman on and off the field - I never heard anybody say a bad word about him, ever.''

Dave Anderson of The New York Times recalled growing up in Brooklyn, rooting for Musial. Those Dodgers crowds helped give Musial his nickname, Stan the Man.

``I thought he was going to knock the fence down in Brooklyn, he'd hit it so often,'' Anderson said.

Musial did it despite an odd left-handed stance - with his legs and knees close together, he would cock the bat near his ear and twist his body away from the pitcher before uncoiling when the ball came.

If that was a lasting snapshot of Musial, the images of Weaver will stay just as fresh - the feisty manager, perhaps with his hat turned backward, looking up at an umpire and screaming at him before kicking dirt somewhere and finally leaving the field.

None of those histrionics should obscure the fact that in the end, Weaver often had the last laugh - to the tune of a .583 career winning percentage.

``When you discuss our game's motivational masters, Earl is a part of that conversation,'' Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson said. ``He was a proven leader in the dugout and loved being a Hall of Famer. Though small in stature, he was a giant as a manager.''

Orioles end scoreless streak with 1-0 win in 10 innings

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Orioles end scoreless streak with 1-0 win in 10 innings

BALTIMORE – It’s early May, and the Orioles have already experienced a round of American League East play, and they like what they’ve seen. 

In an extraordinarily tense game, the Orioles broke a 21-inning scoreless streak by pushing a run across in the 10th inning for a 1-0 win over the New York Yankees before 19,598 at Oriole Park on Thursday night.

The Orioles have played each of their four AL East opponents, and are 9-5 against them. They’ll now play out of the division for 27 games. 

With Kevin Gausman and Masahiro Tanaka both pitching magnificently, it took them leaving the game after eight innings for a run to finally come home. 

Gausman finished by throwing eight scoreless innings, allowing three hits and striking out four. Tanaka gave up five hits in eight shutout innings. 

“I kept telling myself in the dugout, ‘He’s not going to give in, I’m not going to give in,’” Gausman said. 

“That’s just one of those good pitching performances, going back and forth. I felt like I’d sit back in the dugout and then go right back out there.”

Hyun Soo Kim started the 10th with an infield single off Johnny Barbato (1-2). Kim advanced to third on a single to left by Jonathan Schoop. 

Andrew Miller came in to face Pedro Alvarez, who flied to fairly short center. Reimold beat Jacoby Ellsbury’s throw home for the winning run. 

“Just try to get a ball up where I can put a good swing on it and hopefully hit it deep enough or where nobody's [and we] can score. I'm just trying to hit the ball. I'm just trying to square it up. Obviously, if I get a pitch that's up in the zone then there's more probability of the ball being in the air, that's why i was looking for a pitch up and just putting a good swing on it,” Alvarez said. 

Kim, who a month ago had yet to play his first game, is now 10-for-18 in seven games. His .556 batting average is certainly unexpected, but the fun he had in setting up the win, made him ecstatic. 

““It’s just indescribably great for me to win a game like that. I’m really enjoying the moment,” Kim said through his translator. 

Darren O’Day started the ninth with two outs, and after Starlin Castro singled, Zach Britton who hadn’t pitched since spraining his left ankle on Saturday, came in to face Brian McCann. 

On a 3-1 pitch, Britton threw a strike to McCann, and Matt Wieters fired the ball to shortstop where Manny Machado tagged Castro out to end the ninth. 

“That entire at-bat I was kind of feeling like my focus was on whether or not I was going to feel (the ankle discomfort) every pitch, even though I wasn’t. And then, obviously, Matt made a huge play right there to get us back in the dugout. So I felt like that time in the dugout, sitting on the bench, I was able to come down and refocus a little bit,” Britton said. 

After walking Brian McCann to start the 10th and later allowing a stolen base to pinch runner Brett Gardner, Britton (2-1) struck out the side. 

This was Gausman’s third start of the season, and he’s gotten better each time. 

“He was something, wasn’t he? He was solid,” manager Buck Showalter said. 

While Showalter marveled at Gausman’s growth, Yankees manager Joe Girardi seethed. He felt Gausman was balking, and third base umpire Chris Guccione ejected Girardi for arguing after Starlin Castro was left on third to end the top of the fourth. 

Gausman, who can give the Orioles a lift if he can become a topline starter, feels that in his fourth year, he’s finally arriving. 

“I think obviously my confidence is growing. I just feel a lot more confident at this level. Some guys get to the big leagues and already are comfortable. This is the first year I’ve really felt, I know what I’m doing. When I take the mound there’s no question if my stuff is going to play or not. Now, it’s more about making pitches,” Gausman said. 

The Orioles (16-11) took two of three from New York (9-17). 

Showalter used Reimold and Joey Rickard as pinch runners, and continues to use a three-man bench. By the time the Orioles play next, that could change. 

The Orioles have been carrying 13 pitchers, and wanted to keep them all until Britton showed he was physically able to pitch. 

Paul Janish, whose wife is about to deliver their third child, may be joining the team. Showalter also mentioned Jimmy Paredes as a possibility. 

NOTE: The Oakland Athletics begin a three-game series on Friday night. Rich Hill (3-3, 2.53) faces Ubaldo Jimenez (1-3, 5.20).

Why Showalter insists he's not worried about slumping Jones

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Why Showalter insists he's not worried about slumping Jones

BALTIMORE – Adam Jones has had a rocky first month. He entered Thursday night’s game with a .207 average with just one home run and seven runs batted in. 

After grounding out to third in the first inning, Jones is just 1 for his last 12.  

“Adam is, I wouldn’t say frustrated. Adam wants to contribute in every phase of the game,” manager Buck Showalter said. 

“In my list of things that I’m concerned with, I think he’s going to do what Adam’s done for us many years, and I’ve got a long memory.”

Joey Rickard didn’t start the game because Hyun Soo Kim started instead. Showalter likes Rickard’s patience, selectivity and most of all, his attitude. 

“He’s living the American Dream,” Showalter said. 

Gallardo improving, but still not close to returning

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Gallardo improving, but still not close to returning

BALTIMORE – Yovani Gallardo will be eligible to some off the 15-day disabled list this weekend. He’s nowhere ready to be activated, but he remains optimistic.

He was sent to the DL with tendinitis of the right shoulder and biceps. 

Gallardo isn’t ready to begin throwing. 

“Not really, honestly. Obviously, the main thing right now is getting as strong as I can. No point going out there and throwing and going back to square one. I think the main thing is to get the strength to 100 percent and go from there, but hopefully it’s soon,” Gallardo said. 

“I think it’s definitely progressing really well. Really, really well with the exercises that I’ve been doing. It’s right around the corner. I’m anxious. I’m anxious to get back out there and start throwing and work my way back into the rotation.”

Gallardo hasn’t had an arm or shoulder injury before. 

“It’s the first time I’ve been on the DL with an arm issue, period. I’ve been on the DL for other things, but I’ve been able to throw. I think the only one is when I pulled my oblique. That’s the only other one. But the shoulder issue is always tough,” Gallardo said.

“You want to go out there and play catch and do all that sort of thing and you can’t. You can’t and it’s a little bit frustrating, but at the same time I know the guys in the training room are doing what’s best for me and the club. They’re trying to get me right and like I said, I’d rather deal with it only once rather than multiple times.”

Gallardo said that he’s going have to change the way he works out. 
 
“I think it’s something I’m going to incorporate from here on out for the rest of my career. I’ve never had any issues with my shoulder before. I felt like I was doing the stuff I had to do to stay in shape and keep it strong, but obviously the more innings you throw, it’s a little bit different. It’s unfortunate that I had to find out this way, but now I know that I have to incorporate it, whether it be a little bit more weight, a little bit different exercises to maintain that and stay strong,” Gallardo said.