Walt Weiss named the Rockies’ new manager

Walt Weiss named the Rockies’ new manager

Waiting until late into the night Wednesday, the Rockies officially named Walt Weiss the sixth skipper in franchise history, succeeding Don Baylor, Buddy Bell, Clint Hurdle, Jim Leyland and Jim Tracy. Tracy resigned shortly after the 2012 season. Weiss, who played for the Rockies from 1994 through 1997, was chosen for the opening over active…

Bryce Harper exits Nats-Phillies game with apparent leg injury

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Bryce Harper exits Nats-Phillies game with apparent leg injury

Bryce Harper exited Monday night's game between the Nationals and Phillies with an apparent right leg injury after getting hit by an 88 mile per hour fastball in the area of his knee in the top of the seventh inning.

Phillies pitcher Jeremy Hellickson hit Harper either on the knee or just above it, based on the television replay. Harper took first base and stayed in through the next at-bat. But after he got out on a double play, Harper left for the clubhouse. He was then replaced by Chris Heisey in right field when the Nationals went back out on defense.

Harper walked with a visible limp on his way to first base after getting hit. Hellickson immediately challenged him with several pickoff attempts before he got Daniel Murphy to fly out. Phillies outfielder Tyler Goeddel threw to first base before Harper could tag the bag for the double play.

Harper has dealt with a left knee injury in the past, but it was his right knee that appeared to be injured on Monday night.

Harper, 23, is batting .242 with 13 homers and 34 RBI on the season. He was 0-for-2 with a strikeout on Monday night before he left the game.

Orioles open big Red Sox series with big loss

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Orioles open big Red Sox series with big loss

BALTIMORE—The Orioles don’t see many knuckleball pitchers.

There’s Toronto’s R.A. Dickey and Boston’s Steven Wright. After a Memorial Day game against Wright, the Orioles will want to forget that he exists.

After nine innings of flailing away at Wright, the Orioles are hoping they can just forget about him for now and move on to more conventional pitchers. 

As the Orioles looked at this week’s four-game series with the Boston Red Sox, they knew it would be a duel for the top of the American League East, but a chance to miss the great David Price. 

Price might have been preferable to nine innings of Wright. 

Wright baffled the Orioles, pitching his third complete game of the season as the Red Sox pull away for a 7-2 win before 43,926 at Oriole Park on Monday. 

The Orioles (28-21) now trail Boston (31-20) by two games. 

Boston led 3-2 heading to the eighth inning, but four runs off Ashur Tolliver and Mychal Givens enabled the Red Sox to win going away. 

The Orioles had just four hits off Wright (5-4), none after the fifth inning when they tied the score at 2. 

Baltimore’s top five hitters, Adam Jones, Hyun Soo Kim, Manny Machado, Chris Davis and Mark Trumbo, were a combined 0-for-17 against Wright.

“It was a challenge. He had great stuff today. It never ended up where it started. You can’t really predict where to swing. You just hope that you get one that maybe doesn’t move quite as much. If you do, hey, hang with them,” Trumbo said. 

The Orioles tied the game at 2 when Nolan Reimold tripled in the fifth. He scored on Ryan Flaherty’s double. After Caleb Joseph’s single, which snapped an 0-for-19 streak, Jones’ sacrifice fly scored Flaherty.

That was it for the offense. Wright did walk five and throw two wild pitch, and catcher Ryan Hanigan was charged with a passed ball. 

“How do you prepare for it? It’s different. You hope they don’t have a real good one,” manager Buck Showalter said. 

Showalter didn’t have a great day because he knew a call that cost the Orioles a first inning run was wrong, and nothing could be done about it. 

Mookie Betts led off with a single off Tyler Wilson. He moved to second on an infield out by Dustin Pedroia. Xander Bogaerts’ tapper was to the left of home plate. Joseph threw to first, and Betts rounded third and easily scored. 

Showalter came out to argue that the ball was fouled off Bogaerts’ left foot, but none of the umpires saw it, and the call is not one that’s subject to review by replay. 

“I was hoping the first base ump would see it, but it's hard. We can't see it from the dugout and we're closer than the first base umpire for sure. Usually the hitter gives you a reaction that shows you what's going on but he didn't. He smelled a hit and took off. Made good use of the play. We were able to overturn a couple other mistakes but we couldn't overturn that one,” Showalter said. 

Wilson, who allowed three runs on eight hits in 6 2/3 innings, didn’t use the play as an excuse. 

“I saw a great play by Caleb. I thought he got out of there quick, and made an outstanding play to get him at first. He’s a good runner too, and I was a little frustrated with not getting to home plate, though it’s one of those things that you can’t really practice,” Wilson said.

“It just looks a little different and they don’t score there, it’s 2-2 in the seventh rather than 3-2.”

Boston took a 2-0 lead in the third when Betts singled with one out, and after Dustin Pedroia’s single, Bogaerts’ double drove in Betts. 

Jackie Bradley, Jr., led off the sixth with his ninth home run of the season, and Boston led 3-2. 

Wilson (2-4) walked Bogaerts with two outs in the seventh, and Tolliver came in to face David Ortiz. Bogaerts tried to steal second, and was initially called safe, a ruling that was overturned by replay. 

When Tolliver faced Ortiz to start the eighth, he hit a home run to right field, his 14th, and the Red Sox had a 4-2 lead. 

Travis Shaw walked with one out, Blake Swihart singled, and Mychal Givens replaced Tolliver. 

Rookie Marco Hernandez hit his first major league home run with two outs, a three-run shot, and Boston had a five-run lead. 

NOTES: The Orioles have three triples this season, the fewest in baseball. … Bogaerts has a 23-game hitting streak. … The Orioles made two successful replay challenges, and they’re 6-for-12 this season. … Eduardo Rodriguez, making his season debut, faces Kevin Gausman (0-2, 3.24) on Tuesday night. … Joseph injured his groin in the eighth inning and was going to the hospital for an examination. 

Kyle Bernlohr and the greatest save that won't matter

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Kyle Bernlohr and the greatest save that won't matter

It was going to be the defining image in Maryland lacrosse history.

Senior goalie Kyle Bernlohr was lunging forward, contorting his body in the opposite direction, reaching out to deny North Carolina's Chris Cloutier the overtime game-winning goal, the goal that would once again keep Maryland from claiming its first lacrosse national championship since 1975.

Bernlohr's sprawling and explosive save was beautiful, but not immaculate.

His rejection of the championship moment lacked basic technique and execution but made up for it with, well, everything else.

As Cloutier drove toward the crease, Bernlor made one final lunge to match his stick with Cloutier's.

That's when Cloutier dipped to the left, opening up a whole new crop of real estate in the back of the Maryland net.

Bernlohr was out of position and out of options. Cloutier faked high, and had the game-winner in his sights. Bernlohr was on uneven footing and out of position.

Then, instead of finishing low and away, Cloutier kept the head of his stuck up high, drifting away from the goal and away from a better scoring angle. 

Bernlohr made one final if not desperate lunge across his body, snatching the ball and impending defeat from the Tar Heel attackman who would finish the game as the NCAA's all-time leader for goals in a single tournament.

It was supposed to go down as the greatest save in NCAA Tournament history. It was supposed to be the catalyst to Maryland breaking its streak of nine-straight championship game losses. 

Bernlohr's save was the pure embodiment of competitive spirit. It was a magical moment. One that defied proper fundamentals.

But it was also pretty basic "standard operating procedure" for goalies. Your greatest moment is never remembered. You're more likely to be last seen digging a ball out of the back of the net than you are making the game-winning save. The next save is always the most important, which is why the great saves and great clears are hardly ever remembered.

Goals are scored at a premium, 27 on Memorial Day to be exact. The goalie is the last line of defense but given arguably the most difficult task in sports: Stop a 90 MPH shot from ten feet away with minimal equipment standing in front of a net with four times as much surface area as the human body. It's an unenviable task that features brilliant athletic accomplishments forgotten about in a matter of moments.

And so, like the off-balanced, double-clutch 3-pointer hit by North Carolina's Marcus Paige in the waning seconds of the 2016 NCAA Basketball Tournament Championship game against Villanova, and like Jay Beagle's Herculean save in the Capitals' overtime playoff game against the Penguins, Bernlohr's save was on the cutting room floor within moments.

There was Cloutier, playing the role of Kris Jenkins and Nick Bonino, blasting a shot low and away, completely out of reach of Bernlohr, into the back of the net, giving the Tar Heels a 14-13 championship victory. It was his 19th goal of the tournament, the most in NCAA Tournament history.

It was also the lasting image, the one nobody could have expected given what took place just moments prior even though it's all part of the process.

Maryland's championship nightmare remained strong and the greatest save in tournament history was gone, just like that.

But that's the violent nature of sports, and the painful truth of being a goalie. One minute you're the hero and the next you're the goat. It's absolutely heartbreaking, but also remarkably fascinating.

You can't predict sports. You can't script sports. It's better that way, even if it ends with players like Paige, Beagle and now Bernlohr being reduced to mere footnotes.