'Skins coach on RG3: 'He's the starter. Period.'

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'Skins coach on RG3: 'He's the starter. Period.'

From Comcast SportsNet
ASHBURN, Va. (AP) -- No sense fooling around with a talent like Robert Griffin III. Barely a week after the draft, the Washington Redskins are already proclaiming the Heisman Trophy winner their No. 1 quarterback. Saying that Griffin has the ability to do things no one else has done in the NFL, coach Mike Shanahan wrapped up a rookie minicamp Sunday by putting RGIII squarely atop the depth chart. "He's the starter. Period," Shanahan said. Shanahan said Griffin will begin working with the first-teamers when the veterans reconvene for offseason workouts later this month. Fourth-round pick Kirk Cousins and last year's starter Rex Grossman will share snaps to sort out the second- and third-string spots. Shanahan said the Redskins didn't go through all the trouble to get Griffin -- trading three first-round picks and a second-rounder to the St. Louis Rams for the No. 2 overall spot -- just to have him play backup. The coach said he made the decision even before the three-day minicamp. "We're going to adjust our system to what he feels comfortable with," Shanahan said, "and we'll watch him grow and we'll do what we feel like he can do and what he does the best. ... One thing the NFL is not used to is a quarterback with his type of speed and his type of throwing ability, so I think we can do some things that people haven't done." With his announcement, Shanahan managed something that's hard to do -- overshadow Griffin himself. Sunday was the first chance for reporters to see Griffin practice in a Redskins uniform, an event that attracted some 60 members of the media to a 90-minute session consisting mostly of undrafted, unsigned players trying to earn a spot at training camp. Griffin wore the familiar No. 10 that he wore at Baylor, with the moniker "Griffin III" on the back. His shoes were gold with burgundy laces. He's known more for his colorful collection of socks, but he went with the standard white. As usual, his sound bites were spot on. "It's been a while since we've been able to do football things," he said. "We've been doing combines and beauty pageants on pro days, so it's time to get to football." Griffin referenced the challenges he might have as a rookie starting quarterback dealing with veterans. With his disarming smile, he said he even has extra pairs of his shoes, in case the vets want them. "I can't come in flamboyantly, and I don't plan to," he said. "Come in and earn the guys' respect. Even if they say you've already got it, you've still got to go out and earn it." The selection of Cousins raised eyebrows around the league -- no team had taken two quarterbacks in the first four rounds since 1989 -- but Griffin said he was given advanced notice from Shanahan that the Redskins were looking at making such a move to give the team solid, young depth at the position. Griffin and Cousins roomed together at the team hotel this weekend and will likely do so again at training camp. "We went over the playbook together. There's no issues there," Griffin said. "We're both out there trying to get better, so we're cool. We ate a burrito together." "Not the same burrito," he added with a laugh. "Just to clear that up." Cousins, a three-year starter at Michigan State, was no doubt hoping to be drafted by a team that would give him a realistic chance at a starting job in the near future. As it is, he realizes he's likely to be stuck behind Griffin for the entire length of a four-year rookie contract. "The cream always rises to the top, so if I'm as good as I hope to be someday, then I'm going to get that opportunity, whether here or somewhere else," he said. "But right now I have a great opportunity to develop and to learn and to grow." According to Shanahan, Griffin was everything a coach could love during the five practices that made up the minicamp. The rookie had studied in advance and arrived with a rudimentary knowledge of the playbook. "You can see what an incredible athlete he is," Shanahan said. "I was impressed because the first day we didn't have one bust with a formation or a play call, and I don't think I ever had that in any minicamp that I've been involved with." Notes: The Redskins signed their two sixth-round draft picks: RB Alfred Morris from Florida Atlantic and T Tom Compton from South Dakota. ... They also signed five college free agents: WR Brian Hernandez from Utah, DL Delvin Johnson from Marshall, WR Samuel Kirkland from Kent State, OL Nick Martinez from Oklahoma State and TE Beau Reliford from Florida State. ... The team waived college free agents DL Vaughn Meatoga and WR Kelvin Bolden. ... Third-round draft pick Josh LeRibeus, mostly a guard in college, was used as a center during the rookie camp.

Orioles lose their longest game of 2016 in 13 innings

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Orioles lose their longest game of 2016 in 13 innings

Winner: Feliz (2-1)
Loser:   Bundy (0-1)

WHAT WENT WRONG: Dylan Bundy allowed a leadoff triple to Tony Kemp in the bottom of the 13th. After two intentional walks were issued to load the bases, Carlos Correa singled to center to win it for Houston. 

WHAT WENT RIGHT: Chris Tillman had won five straight, but added to his string of quality starts by allowing just two runs on three hits in seven innings. He’s thrown seven consecutive quality starts. 

GOING DEEP: The Orioles’ two runs were home runs. Pedro Alvarez hit his third in the fifth inning. Manny Machado slammed his 13th in the sixth. Both were hit off Astros starter Doug Fister. 

GOING LONG: The Orioles played their longest game of the season. They haven’t played past the 13th inning since Sept. 20, 2013 when they lost in 18 at Tampa Bay. It was their first four hour game of 2016. 

LOTS OF K’S: The Orioles struck out 19 times in 13 innings. 

LEAVING THEM ON: The Orioles twice left the bases loaded. In the second, Ryan Flaherty struck out, and in the ninth, Joey Rickard fanned. They left 11 runners on base. 

HOME RUNS AND TILLMAN: Luis Valbuena’s two run home run off Tillman was just the third he’s allowed in 11 starts, but the second in his last two games. 

THERE HE GOES: Matt Wieters stole his first base since May 26, 2013 in the ninth inning. He has seven stolen bases in his career. 

YOU’RE OUT: Houston’s Colby Rasmus, who visited with manager Buck Showalter in the winter of 2014 about joining the Orioles was ejected by home plate umpire Dana DeMuth for arguing balls and strikes in the sixth inning. 

UP NEXT: Tyler Wilson (2-2, 3.68) faces Collin McHugh (4-4, 5.13) on Wednesday night at 8:10 p.m. 

 

Harvey struggling, Murphy thriving as Nats-Mets rivalry heats up

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Harvey struggling, Murphy thriving as Nats-Mets rivalry heats up

The NL East division will not be decided in the month of May, but the contrast in fortunes for the Nats and Mets was dramatic on Tuesday night at Nationals Park.

Yes, the Nats only lead the Mets by 1 1/2 games in the division after homering them to death in a 7-4 series-tying victory. But they beat them once again with a huge contribution from ex-Met Daniel Murphy and once again at the expense of beleaguered super hero Matt Harvey.

From the moment Murphy left the Mets to sign a three-year deal with the Nationals, it became part of the fabric of one of baseball's best contemporary rivalries. And the way he's played not just overall this season, but in head-to-head matchups with the Mets, has only stoked that fire.

Murphy went 2-for-4 with his seventh homer of the year on Tuesday night and now has two homers in four at-bats against Harvey. He has two RBI in each of his last three games against his former team and has quickly become a pest for the organization he spent 10 distinguished years with.

Harvey, on the other hand, has allowed 11 earned runs combined in his last two starts, both against the Nationals. He is in the midst of a shocking downfall and the Nats are playing a hands-on role.

Only four times did a Nationals hitter swing and miss at a pitch Harvey threw on Tuesday. That matched a season-low. The three homers he surrendered matched a career-high. This is all just one start after the Nats scored nine runs (6 ER) on Harvey, which set a new career mark.

“His velocity started out good," manager Dusty Baker said. "He was 95, 96 miles per hour, then his velocity dropped to 92, 93. His slider wasn’t as sharp as it usually is. You gotta get them when they’re down.”

Murphy, on the other hand, is carrying over the power surge the Mets themselves witnessed last fall. After hitting seven homers in 14 postseason games, Murphy has seven in 45 outings this season. That puts him on pace for 25 homers, nearly double his career-best of 14 set just last year.

Having spent five years around Harvey in New York, Murphy has a unique perspective of his former teammate now facing him from the other side.

"It's tough to tell," Murphy said. "I have all the confidence in the world that he's gonna throw the ball well... I hope it's not against us, or me personally. But we know how good he is, we saw it all year last year. And again, as a pitcher or a hitter, we're never as far away as we think."

Murphy isn't the only player on the Nats who wishes Harvey well, despite his presence in the NL East.

"I know he’s still going to be their go-to guy coming down the stretch and coming down the stretch these guys are going to be right there," center fielder Ben Revere said. 

"Fastball seems the same. He’s throwing strikes. It’s baseball. We’ve been getting the key knocks. Nothing we can do about it. Just goes to show that every pitcher in the big leagues is going to have some rough stretches."

"His stuff is electric. To me he's still the same pitcher that comes after you," third baseman Anthony Rendon said. "Like anybody else, you go through a rough patch, and I'm pretty sure he'll find his way out like every other good pitcher does."

Murphy's two hits on Tuesday - the second against reliever Antonio Bastardo - gave him his 23rd multi-hit game of the season. That means more than half of his games this year have featured multiple hits. He's now batting an MLB-best .392. Only one batter (Yoenis Cespedes) on the Mets is hitting better than .283 at this point in the season.

“I've seen some pretty good hitters, George Brett, Tony Gwynn, Paul Molitor," Baker said. "[Murphy] hasn’t had a down time the entire year. He’s concentrating. He’s at a very high concentration level. When he’s getting his pitch he’s not missing many. Murph’s been the acquisition of the year in baseball. I’m just glad that we have him.”

Harvey's matchups with the Nats over his last two starts have put his career at a momentary crossroads. After his last outing, Tuesday's start was in question. The Mets ultimately decided to keep him in the rotation, but what about his next start? Will he take the mound?

His previous outing was so bad it convinced Mets fans - who booed him at home five days ago - to organize a social media campaign to bus droves of New Yorkers down to D.C. for Tuesday's game. About a hundred of them gathered in right field and were heard loudly before the game and through the first several innings with chants in support of Harvey.

By the fifth inning there were chants of 'Harrrr-veyyy' coming from the crowd, but not from Mets fans. Nationals fans turned the tables and made for yet another embarrassing moment for the Dark Knight of Gotham.

Harvey, for what it's worth, declined to speak to reporters after his latest disaster. Not facing the New York media who are ready to pounce all over you? That may feel good for a night, but it won't go over well in the coming days. Might be wise to avoid the tabloids, Matt.

Strasburg notches another win as Nats rough up Harvey again

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USA TODAY Sports

Strasburg notches another win as Nats rough up Harvey again

Postgame analysis of the Nationals' 7-4 victory over the Mets on Tuesday night: 

How it happened: With both Stephen Strasburg and Matt Harvey looking sharp through the game's first three innings, this looked every bit like the pitchers duel we were expecting to see last week when the two aces faced off in New York. 

But like last Thursday's game, the Nats eventually pounced on Harvey and ended his night earlier than he would have liked. Their home run barrage started in the fourth inning, when Ryan Zimmerman and Anthony Rendon delivered back-to-back solo shots to give Washington a 2-1 lead. The next inning, after Bryce Harper hit a sac fly to make it 3-1, Daniel Murphy (who else?) delivered the big blow with a a two-run shot to give the Nats a 5-1 cushion and essentially yank Harvey from the game. 

After the Mets gone a run back in the seventh, Ben Revere hit his first home run as a member of the Nats to extend the lead to 6-2. The long ball parade continued in the eighth as Wilson Ramos got into the act with a solo shot. 

What it means: The Nats were able to bounce back after Monday night's blowout loss. At 28-18, they're 1 1/2 games up on the Mets for first place in the NL East. While it's clear that these are the two best teams in the division, there's plenty of season left before it can be determined which club is truly superior.  

Strasburg extends winning streak: It's pretty simple at this point: if Strasburg takes the mound, the Nats win. That's been the case now for 14 consecutive starts — extending a franchise record. Once again, Strasburg was solid against the Mets, allowing two earned runs on four hits over 6 2/3 innings. His 11 strikeouts on the night marked the fifth time this season that he has registered double digit punch outs in a start. Strasburg is now 8-0 on the year with a 2.79 ERA and 86 strikeouts. Not too shabby. 

Nats rough up Harvey again: For the second time in less than a week, Washington's offense put up a few crooked numbers on the scoreboard to chase Harvey early in the game. Including Tuesday's outing, the Mets struggling ace has allowed 14 runs on 16 hits over 7 2/3 innings against the Nats in two starts. Ouch. If Harvey winds up temporarily removed from New York's rotation, Mets fans can thank their division rivals from D.C. 

Murphy keeps hurting his old club: With yet another solid performance, the Nats second baseman might be making the Mets wish they would have kept him around a little while longer. In five games against his former team, Murphy is hitting 8-for-21 (.380) with two home runs — both coming off Harvey — and 6 RBI. 

Up next: The rubber match in this series will be a matinee tilt on Wednesday at 1:05 p.m. The Nats will send Tanner Roark (3-3, 2.89 ERA) to oppose Mets rookie Steven Matz (6-1, 2.81 ERA).