Reid won't be back as Eagles' coach


Reid won't be back as Eagles' coach

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) Andy Reid's time is up as coach of the Philadelphia Eagles.

Reid is out after 14 years in charge, three people familiar with the decision told The Associated Press following Sunday's 42-7 season-ending loss to the New York Giants.

Reid is scheduled to meet with owner Jeffrey Lurie on Monday to discuss his future and an official announcement will come afterward, according to one person, who spoke on condition of anonymity because a final agreement hasn't been reached. That person says there's a chance Reid might remain with the team in some capacity.

Reid is due to make $6 million in 2013 in the final year of his contract. He said he wants to coach next year, but it's possible Lurie could persuade him to take a season off and perhaps help out in the front office in an ``advisory'' role.

Eagles spokesman Derek Boyko denied several reports that Lurie has already fired Reid, saying it's ``absolutely, 100 percent'' untrue.

The Eagles (4-12) finished their worst season under Reid by losing 11 of their last 12 games. They missed the playoffs two straight years for the first time in Reid's tenure.

After the ugly loss to the Giants (9-7), Reid sounded like a man who knew he was going to lose his job.

As usual, he began his opening statement by listing injuries and finished with the same line: ``Time is yours.''

His time has run out in Philadelphia.

``We weren't very good,'' Reid said. ``That's my responsibility and I take complete blame for it.''

Asked if he wants to return in 2013, Reid said: ``I'm all in.''

Lurie said after the Eagles went 8-8 in 2011 that he considered firing Reid. He gave him another chance, but said before this season that 8-8 would be ``unacceptable.''

``I go in eyes wide open,'' Reid said of his meeting with Lurie. ``Either way, I understand. Whatever he chooses will be the right thing. He always does things for the best interests of the Eagles.''

Reid won more games (140) than any coach in franchise history. He led the Eagles to nine playoff appearances, six division titles, five NFC championship games and one Super Bowl loss.

But he couldn't win the big one and that's how he's measured in a city that hasn't celebrated an NFL title since 1960.

The Eagles haven't won a playoff game since 2008 and took significant steps backward the last two years. They entered both seasons with high expectations only to fail miserably.

``We had quite a run,'' offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg said.

Players said they expect changes, but continued to support Reid.

``He's a great man and I love him to death,'' said quarterback Michael Vick, who could've played his last game with the Eagles. ``I wish I could've done more. A lot of players wish they could've done more. Coaches can't play the games.''

The Eagles talked all week about wanting to win one for Reid. Instead, they suffered another embarrassing loss to cap a dismal season.

``We came, we stunk it up and we lost. It was terrible. No heart,'' defensive tackle Cullen Jenkins said.

Like Jenkins, Vick also questioned his teammates' desire before trying to clarify his comment.

``It's frustrating,'' Vick said. ``It's difficult because, me, I leave it all out on the field and I give everything I got. Sometimes, I wish I could play other positions, but I can't.''

Vick missed the previous six games, sitting out the first five with a concussion and then being inactive last week. Vick only got the start because rookie Nick Foles broke his hand.

Vick is due to earn about $16 million next year, but the Eagles can release him without taking a financial hit. He wants to be a starter and is unsure whether he even wants to come back.

``I don't know. I have to take time to think about everything that's happened,'' Vick said.

This already was a difficult year for Reid. He endured a devastating loss weeks before the season opener when his oldest son, Garrett Reid, died at training camp after a long battle with drug addiction.

In October, Reid fired close friend and longtime assistant Juan Castillo, who was in his second season as defensive coordinator after coaching the offensive line for 13 years. He later fired defensive-line coach Jim Washburn.

After beating the defending Super Bowl champion Giants on Sept. 30, the Eagles lost eight straight games - their worst losing streak in 42 years.


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Alex Ovechkin laces up his skates and hosts ASHA event

Alex Ovechkin laces up his skates and hosts ASHA event

More than 60 children and adolescents from American Special Hockey Association programs skated with Capitals captain Alex Ovechkin during a skating session on Oct. 21 at Kettler Capitals Iceplex in Arlington, Va.

The event marked the third consecutive season Ovechkin has hosted ASHA for a skating session at Kettler Capitals Iceplex. During the first skate in 2014, Ovechkin met 11-year-old Washington Ice Dogs player Ann Schaab and granted her request for a sushi date following a preseason game. Inspired by his relationship with Schaab, Ovechkin announced his plans to donate the car to ASHA during the National Hockey League’s 2015 NHL All-Star Weekend.

Ovechkin and Schaab’s friendship inspired the character Ann in the children’s book Drop the Puck, Let’s Play Hockey by Jayne J. Jones Beehler. Prior to the skate Schaab presented Ovechkin with a copy of the book in the Capitals locker room. Proceeds from book sales through Nov. 7 will benefit ASHA. The book is available for purchase online at

Following the event, ASHA president Mike Hickey presented Ovechkin with the 2016 Inspiration Award in honor of Ovechkin’s commitment to the organization.

The skate marked one of many community initiatives Ovechkin will support throughout the 2016-17 season, including Ovi’s Crazy 8s. Ovechkin created Ovi’s Crazy 8s in 2006, a program through which he purchases and donates eight Capitals season tickets to Most Valuable Kids and ASHA, allowing fans who normally wouldn’t have access to tickets the opportunity to attend games. Ovechkin also supports organizations that grant wishes of sick children. In 2015, Washingtonian Magazine named Ovechkin as a ‘Washingtonian of the Year’ for his efforts in the community, including his relationship with ASHA. He also was a finalist for the Mark Messier NHL Leadership award, presented to the player who exemplifies great leadership qualities to his team, on and off the ice.

Created in 2000 for players with development disabilities, ASHA gives people of all ages and abilities a chance to learn and grow by playing hockey. There are currently more than 60 ASHA programs in more than 54 cities throughout the United States. Programs skating with Ovechkin on Oct. 12 include the Baltimore Saints, Montgomery Cheetahs, Nova Cool Cats and Washington Ice Dogs, with participants ranging from ages eight through 30.

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Penn Quarter Q&A: Who has impressed and where do the Caps need to improve?


Penn Quarter Q&A: Who has impressed and where do the Caps need to improve?

It's that time of the week again where we answer your questions and make you the smartest Caps fans in the area.

This week, Capitals Insider Tarik El-Bashir and Capitals correspondent J.J. Regan sat down on Facebook to answer your questions live. They talk about who has impressed them so far this season, what was the best personnel move the team made in the offseason, what the team still needs to improve on and more. Check it out in the video below.

Penn Quarter Q&A - October 21, 2016

Capitals Insider Tarik El-Bashir and JJ Regan here to answer your hockey questions for this week's Penn Quarter Sports Tavern Q&A. Hit us up!

Posted by CSN Mid-Atlantic on Friday, October 21, 2016

Don't forget, the Penn Quarter Q&A takes place every week. Follow CSN Capitals on Twitter for the latest updates on next week's Q&A.