Reid won't be back as Eagles' coach

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Reid won't be back as Eagles' coach

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) Andy Reid's time is up as coach of the Philadelphia Eagles.

Reid is out after 14 years in charge, three people familiar with the decision told The Associated Press following Sunday's 42-7 season-ending loss to the New York Giants.

Reid is scheduled to meet with owner Jeffrey Lurie on Monday to discuss his future and an official announcement will come afterward, according to one person, who spoke on condition of anonymity because a final agreement hasn't been reached. That person says there's a chance Reid might remain with the team in some capacity.

Reid is due to make $6 million in 2013 in the final year of his contract. He said he wants to coach next year, but it's possible Lurie could persuade him to take a season off and perhaps help out in the front office in an ``advisory'' role.

Eagles spokesman Derek Boyko denied several reports that Lurie has already fired Reid, saying it's ``absolutely, 100 percent'' untrue.

The Eagles (4-12) finished their worst season under Reid by losing 11 of their last 12 games. They missed the playoffs two straight years for the first time in Reid's tenure.

After the ugly loss to the Giants (9-7), Reid sounded like a man who knew he was going to lose his job.

As usual, he began his opening statement by listing injuries and finished with the same line: ``Time is yours.''

His time has run out in Philadelphia.

``We weren't very good,'' Reid said. ``That's my responsibility and I take complete blame for it.''

Asked if he wants to return in 2013, Reid said: ``I'm all in.''

Lurie said after the Eagles went 8-8 in 2011 that he considered firing Reid. He gave him another chance, but said before this season that 8-8 would be ``unacceptable.''

``I go in eyes wide open,'' Reid said of his meeting with Lurie. ``Either way, I understand. Whatever he chooses will be the right thing. He always does things for the best interests of the Eagles.''

Reid won more games (140) than any coach in franchise history. He led the Eagles to nine playoff appearances, six division titles, five NFC championship games and one Super Bowl loss.

But he couldn't win the big one and that's how he's measured in a city that hasn't celebrated an NFL title since 1960.

The Eagles haven't won a playoff game since 2008 and took significant steps backward the last two years. They entered both seasons with high expectations only to fail miserably.

``We had quite a run,'' offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg said.

Players said they expect changes, but continued to support Reid.

``He's a great man and I love him to death,'' said quarterback Michael Vick, who could've played his last game with the Eagles. ``I wish I could've done more. A lot of players wish they could've done more. Coaches can't play the games.''

The Eagles talked all week about wanting to win one for Reid. Instead, they suffered another embarrassing loss to cap a dismal season.

``We came, we stunk it up and we lost. It was terrible. No heart,'' defensive tackle Cullen Jenkins said.

Like Jenkins, Vick also questioned his teammates' desire before trying to clarify his comment.

``It's frustrating,'' Vick said. ``It's difficult because, me, I leave it all out on the field and I give everything I got. Sometimes, I wish I could play other positions, but I can't.''

Vick missed the previous six games, sitting out the first five with a concussion and then being inactive last week. Vick only got the start because rookie Nick Foles broke his hand.

Vick is due to earn about $16 million next year, but the Eagles can release him without taking a financial hit. He wants to be a starter and is unsure whether he even wants to come back.

``I don't know. I have to take time to think about everything that's happened,'' Vick said.

This already was a difficult year for Reid. He endured a devastating loss weeks before the season opener when his oldest son, Garrett Reid, died at training camp after a long battle with drug addiction.

In October, Reid fired close friend and longtime assistant Juan Castillo, who was in his second season as defensive coordinator after coaching the offensive line for 13 years. He later fired defensive-line coach Jim Washburn.

After beating the defending Super Bowl champion Giants on Sept. 30, the Eagles lost eight straight games - their worst losing streak in 42 years.

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Orioles open big Red Sox series with big loss

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Orioles open big Red Sox series with big loss

BALTIMORE—The Orioles don’t see many knuckleball pitchers.

There’s Toronto’s R.A. Dickey and Boston’s Steven Wright. After a Memorial Day game against Wright, the Orioles will want to forget that he exists.

After nine innings of flailing away at Wright, the Orioles are hoping they can just forget about him for now and move on to more conventional pitchers. 

As the Orioles looked at this week’s four-game series with the Boston Red Sox, they knew it would be a duel for the top of the American League East, but a chance to miss the great David Price. 

Price might have been preferable to nine innings of Wright. 

Wright baffled the Orioles, pitching his third complete game of the season as the Red Sox pull away for a 7-2 win before 43,926 at Oriole Park on Monday. 

The Orioles (28-21) now trail Boston (31-20) by two games. 

Boston led 3-2 heading to the eighth inning, but four runs off Ashur Tolliver and Mychal Givens enabled the Red Sox to win going away. 

The Orioles had just four hits off Wright (5-4), none after the fifth inning when they tied the score at 2. 

Baltimore’s top five hitters, Adam Jones, Hyun Soo Kim, Manny Machado, Chris Davis and Mark Trumbo, were a combined 0-for-17 against Wright.

“It was a challenge. He had great stuff today. It never ended up where it started. You can’t really predict where to swing. You just hope that you get one that maybe doesn’t move quite as much. If you do, hey, hang with them,” Trumbo said. 

The Orioles tied the game at 2 when Nolan Reimold tripled in the fifth. He scored on Ryan Flaherty’s double. After Caleb Joseph’s single, which snapped an 0-for-19 streak, Jones’ sacrifice fly scored Flaherty.

That was it for the offense. Wright did walk five and throw two wild pitch, and catcher Ryan Hanigan was charged with a passed ball. 

“How do you prepare for it? It’s different. You hope they don’t have a real good one,” manager Buck Showalter said. 

Showalter didn’t have a great day because he knew a call that cost the Orioles a first inning run was wrong, and nothing could be done about it. 

Mookie Betts led off with a single off Tyler Wilson. He moved to second on an infield out by Dustin Pedroia. Xander Bogaerts’ tapper was to the left of home plate. Joseph threw to first, and Betts rounded third and easily scored. 

Showalter came out to argue that the ball was fouled off Bogaerts’ left foot, but none of the umpires saw it, and the call is not one that’s subject to review by replay. 

“I was hoping the first base ump would see it, but it's hard. We can't see it from the dugout and we're closer than the first base umpire for sure. Usually the hitter gives you a reaction that shows you what's going on but he didn't. He smelled a hit and took off. Made good use of the play. We were able to overturn a couple other mistakes but we couldn't overturn that one,” Showalter said. 

Wilson, who allowed three runs on eight hits in 6 2/3 innings, didn’t use the play as an excuse. 

“I saw a great play by Caleb. I thought he got out of there quick, and made an outstanding play to get him at first. He’s a good runner too, and I was a little frustrated with not getting to home plate, though it’s one of those things that you can’t really practice,” Wilson said.

“It just looks a little different and they don’t score there, it’s 2-2 in the seventh rather than 3-2.”

Boston took a 2-0 lead in the third when Betts singled with one out, and after Dustin Pedroia’s single, Bogaerts’ double drove in Betts. 

Jackie Bradley, Jr., led off the sixth with his ninth home run of the season, and Boston led 3-2. 

Wilson (2-4) walked Bogaerts with two outs in the seventh, and Tolliver came in to face David Ortiz. Bogaerts tried to steal second, and was initially called safe, a ruling that was overturned by replay. 

When Tolliver faced Ortiz to start the eighth, he hit a home run to right field, his 14th, and the Red Sox had a 4-2 lead. 

Travis Shaw walked with one out, Blake Swihart singled, and Mychal Givens replaced Tolliver. 

Rookie Marco Hernandez hit his first major league home run with two outs, a three-run shot, and Boston had a five-run lead. 

NOTES: The Orioles have three triples this season, the fewest in baseball. … Bogaerts has a 23-game hitting streak. … The Orioles made two successful replay challenges, and they’re 6-for-12 this season. … Eduardo Rodriguez, making his season debut, faces Kevin Gausman (0-2, 3.24) on Tuesday night. … Joseph injured his groin in the eighth inning and was going to the hospital for an examination. 

Kyle Bernlohr and the greatest save that won't matter

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Kyle Bernlohr and the greatest save that won't matter

It was going to be the defining image in Maryland lacrosse history.

Senior goalie Kyle Bernlohr was lunging forward, contorting his body in the opposite direction, reaching out to deny North Carolina's Chris Cloutier the overtime game-winning goal, the goal that would once again keep Maryland from claiming its first lacrosse national championship since 1975.

Bernlohr's sprawling and explosive save was beautiful, but not immaculate. He rejection of the championship moment lacked basic technique and execution but made up for it with, well, everything else.

As Cloutier drove toward the crease, Bernlor made one final lunge to match his stick with Cloutier's.

That's when Cloutier dipped to the left, opening up a whole new crop of real estate in the back of the Maryland net.

Bernlohr was out of position and out of options. Cloutier faked high, and had the game-winner in his sights. Bernlohr was on uneven footing and out of position.

Then, instead of finishing low and away, Cloutier kept the head of his stuck up high, drifting away from the goal and away from a better scoring angle. 

Bernlohr made one final if not desperate lunge across his body, snatching the ball and impending defeat from the Tar Heel attackmen who would finish the game as the NCAA's all-time leader for goals in a single tournament.

It was supposed to go down as the greatest save in NCAA Tournament history. It was supposed to be the catalyst to Maryland breaking its streak of nine-straight championship game losses. 

Bernlohr's save as the pure embodiment of competative spirit. It was a magical moment. One that defied proper fundamentals.

It was a raw moment of sheer sports.

But like the off-balanced, double-clutch 3-pointer hit by North Carolina's Marcus Paige in the waning seconds of the 2016 NCAA Basketball Tournament Championship game against Villanova, and like Jay Beagle's Herculean save in the Capitals' overtime playoff game agaisnt the Penguins, Bernlohr's save was on the cutting room floor within moments.

There was Cloutier, playing the role of Kris Jenkins and Nick Bonino, blasting a shot low and away, completely out of reach of Bernlohr, into the back of the net, giving the Tar Heels a 14-13 championship victory. It was his 19th goal of the tournament, the most in NCAA Tournament history.

It was also the lasting image, the one nobody could have expected given what took place just moments prior.

Maryland's championship nightmare remained strong and the greatest save in tournament history was gone, just like that.

But that's the violent nature of sports. One minute you're the hero and the next you're the goat. It's absolutely heartbreaking, but also remarkably refreshing.

You can't predict sports. You can't script sports. It's better that way, even if it ends with players like Paige, beagle and now Bernlohr being reduced to mere footnotes. 

Gio Gonzalez shaves his luscious locks for a great cause

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Gio Gonzalez shaves his luscious locks for a great cause

Nationals pitcher Gio Gonzalez made a major change on Memorial Day.

Having lost two straight starts for the first time all year, Gonzalez needed to do something to get his groove back.

Instead of changing his release point, tinkering with his delivery or deciding to pitch with his left hand, Gonzalez went all in and cut off his hair.

All of it.

Gonzalez sported somewhat scruffy hair during the 2015 season and decided to grow it out, entering the 2016 season with shoulder length hair. But it's all gone now and for a good cause.

Gonzalez is donating his hair to "Locks for Love," a foundation that helps make wigs for children that loss their hair due to medical conditions.

Perhaps it's just the change Gonzalez needs to get back on track. But regardless he's showing support for those in need.