Jay Cutler admits he was wrong

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Jay Cutler admits he was wrong

From Comcast SportsNetCHICAGO (AP) -- Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler acknowledged Tuesday that he was wrong to shove teammate J'Marcus Webb on the sideline during the loss at Green Bay last week.He has no second thoughts about yelling at him, however."I probably shouldn't have bumped him, I'll go with that," Cutler told WMVP-AM in Chicago. "As far as me yelling at him and trying to get him going in the game, I don't regret that. I shouldn't have bumped him, I'll stick to that."Cutler drew widespread attention for berating and bumping Webb, the starting left tackle, on the sideline and for making some pointed postgame comments after the 23-10 loss to the Packers on Thursday. National analysts such as Terry Bradshaw and Bill Cowher spoke out, and so did Bears defensive back D.J. Moore this week, saying the quarterback was wrong to go after Webb like that.Cutler looked great in a season-opening blowout over Indianapolis, finding new receiver Brandon Marshall often, but it was a different story last week. He threw four interceptions and got sacked seven times, an all-too-familiar sight for a quarterback who took a beating the previous two years under former offensive coordinator Mike Martz. His tirade against Webb and lack of remorse he showed in the postgame interview brought back questions about his leadership and demeanor.As for why the outburst happened at that particular moment, Cutler wasn't sure."I can't put a definite reason why it happened," he said. "It happened. It's an emotional game. I put a lot into playing quarterback, and I take it seriously. It's just one of the things that happened during the game. Since then, we've talked about it, and it's really behind us."Cutler discussed the incident "with the powers that be" and with the linemen individually. Did he apologize to Webb?"That's between me and J'Marcus," Cutler said. "We've talked. It's in the past. We're moving on. He's our left tackle. He's my left tackle, and I expect him each and every week to play at a certain level. And I think he expects himself to play that way, too."Webb will certainly have to do better, considering Clay Matthews went off for 312 sacks, but he wasn't the only Bears player who had problems. Marshall had just two catches and dropped a potential touchdown pass, yet Cutler consoled him after that.So why didn't Webb get similar treatment?"Everyone's different," Cutler said. "Everyone reacts differently. I've known Brandon for a long time. I've played a lot of football with Brandon (in Denver). I know what Brandon's capable of at a high level, and I know no one was more disappointed in that stadium or as a Bears fan than Brandon Marshall for dropping that touchdown. I know that genuinely in my heart."He also said the offense as a whole needs to improve, including himself. But if there are any lingering issues surrounding the incident, Cutler doesn't see any."We went out there (for practice on Monday), started preparing for St. Louis, had a crisp practice, put in some good stuff," he said. "I think in our building internally, we kind of circle the wagons. I don't care if you win, you lose, there's going to be criticism. There's always going to be something that someone's picking on, someone's trying to make a story out of."He was asked if he can lead the Bears. To that, Cutler said, "Without a doubt. Without a doubt."He was also asked about Moore's comments."He's entitled to his opinion and whatever he wants to say is up to him," Cutler said.Cutler disputed the idea that he lost his composure against the Packers, saying, mistakes by him and other players derailed the Bears. He said he knew what he was doing "as we were calling plays, and everything was going smoothly."In fact, he insisted he wasn't rattled."I'm actually proud of that game," he said. "I thought I fought. I thought I competed hard, made a few errant throws. But whenever we got what we were looking for, I put the ball on the money for the most part."

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Nats creating distance, Harper keeps rolling, can Murphy still win MVP?

Nats creating distance, Harper keeps rolling, can Murphy still win MVP?

Notes and observations from the Nats' 4-0 win over the Phillies on Monday night at Citizens Bank Park…

Roark bounces back: Tanner Roark rebounded nicely from his uneven start against the Orioles last Wednesday to go seven shutout innings with just four hits and a walk surrendered against the Phillies. It was the 16th time in 27 starts this season that Roark has lasted at least seven innings. And it was the eighth time this year that Roark has gone at least seven frames with zero earned runs allowed. No other pitcher has done that more times this year than Roark.

Roark's season ERA is now at 2.87, almost exactly the 2.85 mark he put up in 2014, his last full year as a starter. His ERA+, though, is better at 146, compared to the 131 he had in 2014. And his strikeout rate (7.1 SO/9) is better than it was two years ago (6.3).

Werth hits No. 19: Jayson Werth hit another homer on Monday night, his third in his last four games. He now has 19 on the year, one away from recording the sixth 20-homer season of his career. Werth has seven in August alone which ties the most he's ever hit in a month since he signed with the Nats before the 2011 season. His career-high is eight, set back in 2010 with the Phillies.

Harper gets on again: Bryce Harper didn't get a hit on Monday night, but he did walk and score a run and has now reached base in all 16 games he's played since coming back from the neck stiffness that kept him out a week. In those 16 games he's hit 22-for-61 (.361) with three homers, 17 RBI, 11 walks, 13 runs, six doubles and three steals. His OPS during that stretch is 1.098. That's not a huge sample size, 16 games, but it's more than half a month. If he can be anything close to that for the final month of the season, the Nats' lineup could look a lot different. 

Murphy keeps it up: It has perhaps gone unnoticed by some with the emergence of Trea Turner and the resurgence of Harper, but Daniel Murphy is having another very good month at the plate. With his two hits on Monday, Murphy is now 30-for-93 (.323) with five homers, 22 RBI, 20 runs and a .933 OPS in August. 

Murphy still has the best batting average in the NL at .345, but he has some work to do if he still wants to win the league's MVP award. He's currently tied for third in fWAR with Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford. They are both at 4.9, while Kris Bryant (7.6) and Corey Seager (6.9) are far ahead. It seems amazing that Murphy could be hitting .345 with 25 homers and 98 RBI on a first-place team and at this point be third in the MVP race, but that's where he realistically stands right now. Bryant and Seager also lead first-place teams. Bryant is hitting .305 with 35 homers and an MLB-best 109 runs scored, while Seager is batting .323 with 23 homers and also plays plus-defense at shortstop.

Magic number to 23: It's that time of year. With the Nats' win on Monday night and the Marlins having lost their third straight game, the Nats' magic number to win the NL East is now 23. That's pretty low for this point of the season and it could start going down very quickly. The Nats do not play a team outside of the NL East until they go to Pittsburgh on Sept. 23. And the Nats have the best intra-division record in baseball at 36-16.

[RELATED: Turner on playing like a little kid, rest helped Ramos]

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Redskins Playbook: QB Sudfeld now on a compressed learning schedule

Redskins Playbook: QB Sudfeld now on a compressed learning schedule

The Redskins hit the practice field today, suddenly finding themselves on a compressed schedule. Their preseason finale against the Bucs has been moved up from Thursday to Wednesday and now the backups who are looking to put on a good showing to stay employed in the NFL, either with the Redskins or on another team, have 24 hours less to prepare.

Here’s what we’re looking for at Redskins Park today:

—The shortened schedule will affect Nate Sudfeld the most. Jay Gruden said that the rookie quarterback will start against the Bucs and play the whole game. Yesterday Sudfeld talked about all of the play changes and other calls he will have to make it at the line of scrimmage. He now has considerably less time to become comfortable with the calls.

—Will Josh Doctson practice? He sent out a tweet last night that made it sound like he was going to be removed from the PUP list. Today might be the day; it’s the last practice for nearly a week and they might want to get him out there, perhaps push his Achilles just a bit, and then give him a few days to recover.

—How about Spencer Long? He picked a bad time to get injured, just when it looked like he might hang on to the starting left guard job. Now Shawn Lauvao steps in and, if he stays healthy, he might not step out. As with Doctson, the timing makes it difficult. With just one practice and the possibility that Sudfeld and the backups will get a lot of the snaps, does Long press to get back today? Or rest today and get ready for preparations for the Steelers next week, even if that creates the risk that he will be preparing with the second team.

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Matt Judon looks like rookie who will help Ravens pass rush most

Matt Judon looks like rookie who will help Ravens pass rush most

OWINGS MILLS – The rookie who makes the most impact on the Ravens’ pass rush immediately could be fifth-round pick Matt Judon.

Second-round pick Kamalei Correa has faded into the background since early in camp, and third-round pick Bronson Kaufusi (broken ankle) suffered a season-ending injury. Meanwhile, Judon keeps making plays. He had his third sack of the preseason against the Lions, and when the Ravens host the Bills to open the regular season, Judon should see snaps as a situational pass rusher.

Judon wanted to impress Ravens coach John Harbaugh playing against the Lions’ starters Saturday night. Mission accomplished.

“I thought he stepped up,” Harbaugh said. “I thought he answered the call. He had a big sack for us and played fast. The speed of the game for him coming from the Division II level (Grand Valley State) is going to be a transition. It is way faster (in the NFL). This is way faster than the Southeastern Conference, let alone where he is used to playing. But he is really catching up with the speed very quickly.”

The Ravens believe they have at least four effective edge rushers in Terrell Suggs, Elvis Dumervil, Za’Darius Smith, and Judon to attack quarterbacks starting Week 1. Suggs and Dumervil, two veterans coming off injuries, are unlikely to have midseason stamina during the first few games. That makes Smith and Judon even more important as younger pass rushers who will need to be effective immediately.

Suggs likes what he sees from Judon. So do all the Ravens.

“He gets on the passer,” Suggs said. “When you can rush the passer by community, it makes you a pretty much deadly team, and we like that.”