This golfer just won 11.4 million


This golfer just won 11.4 million

From Comcast SportsNetATLANTA (AP) -- Brandt Snedeker doesn't claim to be the best player in the world, the best player on the PGA Tour or even the best overall player in the FedEx Cup playoffs. All he needed was the best round of his career at East Lake to become FedEx Cup champion, giving him the biggest paycheck in golf.And he's not about to apologize for that."Life is all about timing," Snedeker said with a sneaky grin.He proved to be the right man in the right place Sunday in the Tour Championship. On a tough day on a tree-lined course, Snedeker overcame an early double bogey in the water with four big birdies and closed with a 2-under 68, making him the only player in the final five groups to break par.That gave him a three-shot win over Justin Rose and two trophies in one day -- the Tour Championship and its 1.44 million prize, and the FedEx Cup with its 10 million. That's more money than Snedeker had made in his career going into the 2012 season."You go out there and play that round of golf, with that kind of pressure on that tough of a golf course, and to go through the adversity I had to go through, hitting the ball in the water and making a double bogey early and fighting my way back ... that's what you work your whole life for," he said. "This is about as close as I get to speechless."Snedeker was tied with Rose going into the last round, though he could not ignore the presence of Rory McIlroy, who was three shots behind, and Tiger Woods, who was four back. McIlroy (1), Woods (2) and Snedeker (5) were among the top five seeds in the FedEx Cup going into the final event, meaning any of them only had to win the Tour Championship to capture the FedEx Cup.Never mind that McIlroy had won four times this year against the strongest fields, including a record eight-shot win in the PGA Championship and back-to-back wins in playoff events at Bethpage Black and the TPC Boston that make him the clear-cut No. 1 player in the world.The FedEx Cup was designed to put everything up for grabs in the Tour Championship, with the better odds given to the higher seeds.McIlroy, who had 11 consecutive rounds in the 60s going into Sunday at East Lake, knew that as well as anyone. This is one time the Boy Wonder couldn't deliver. He lost four shots in a four-hole stretch on the front nine -- including a tee shot in the water on the par-3 sixth for a double bogey -- and never recovered.He closed with a 74 and tied for 10th."I'm a little disappointed, but at the same time, Brandt really deserves to win," McIlroy said. "He played the best golf out of anyone. He knew what he needed to do. He needed to come in here and win. He controlled his own destiny, just like I did. And he was able to come and do that. So because of that, he really deserves it."Woods also faded early, missing the fairway with a 3-wood on the opening hole and making bogey. He also found the water on the sixth hole for double bogey, and Woods didn't make a birdie until the par-5 ninth. He ended with a birdie from tap-in range on the 18th for a 72 to tie for eighth."I just didn't have it this weekend," said Woods, trying to win the FedEx Cup for the third time in its six-year history.Snedeker turned his fortunes around with a 40-foot birdie putt on the eighth hole, which was bound to roll some 6 feet by the hole until it crashed into the cup. As Rose kept close, Snedeker poured in an 18-foot birdie putt on the 13th. When Ryan Moore made two straight birdies to tie for the lead at the par-5 15th, Snedeker knocked his approach onto the green for a two-putt birdie.The clincher came on the 17th, when Snedeker chipped in from the front of the green to take a four-shot lead into the final hole. He never looked at a leaderboard all day. He was unaware that Moore finished with three straight bogeys, and only figured he had a comfortable margin against Rose.In his worst swing of the day, Snedeker hammered a hybrid into the grandstands on the 18th, leading to a meaningless bogey.There were times when golf could have felt meaningless. Snedeker had to miss five tournaments this summer, including the U.S. Open, with a rib injury that might have cost him a chance at making the Ryder Cup team. U.S. captain Davis Love III picked him anyway because he wanted good putters.If there were any questions about that pick, Snedeker answered them."He's looking pretty good, yeah," Woods said.More than his own small injury, Snedeker endured a year in which his father had a liver transplant. More recently, the son of his swing coach suffered critical injuries in a car crash. Tucker Anderson, in a responsive coma, was transferred to an Atlanta hospital, and Snedeker went by to see him Sunday morning.The teen couldn't speak, but the message came through."I asked him if he thought I was going to beat Rory McIlroy, and he gave me a wink," Snedeker said.Equally impressive as his win was how Snedeker handled the notion of an 11.44 million payday (1 million of the FedEx Cup bonus goes into his retirement fund). He called a sum that size "like winning the lottery," before explaining a little bit more about who he is and how he was raised.His father always taught him not to buy anything he couldn't pay for, and Snedeker has followed the instruction. He has a house in Nashville, Tenn., that he said was "not grandiose." He still drives the SUV he bought after he made it to the PGA Tour six years ago."I'm not by any means a flashy guy," he said. "Of anybody that I know, I do not need 11 million. So there are going to be things we can do to really help people. So that's the way I look at it. This is unbelievable to be financially stable for the rest of my career. As long as I'm not an idiot, I should be fine, really. I really think we can make a difference and help a lot of people out in Nashville and Tennessee and the surrounding areas."Next up is a tournament that doesn't pay a dime. Snedeker was headed to Chicago on Monday for his first Ryder Cup. A performance like this can only help."I'm not under any illusion of being calm next week," he said. "I know it's going to be a very pressure-packed week. But I am going to use today as a huge thing to fall back on next week. I played against the best in the world this week for 72 holes and I beat them."At just the right time.

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Five reasons why it will take more than a bye week to fix the Ravens' woes

Five reasons why it will take more than a bye week to fix the Ravens' woes

Taking a four-game losing streak into their bye week, the Ravens (3-4) are reeling.

After starting the season with three consecutive wins, the Ravens have dropped four straight, including a woeful Week 7 loss to the Jets in which the team blew a 10-0 lead. 

The best news for the Ravens is that the AFC North remains a three-team race among the Steelers (4-3), Bengals (3-4), and Ravens.

However, here are five reasons why the Ravens will need more than a bye week to fix what’s wrong:


1. The offense has been inept all season.

In four of their seven games, the Ravens have scored just one touchdown. Firing offensive coordinator Marc Trestman two games ago didn’t fix it. New offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg can tweak the offense during the bye, but he can’t change the players. The offensive issues with this team run far deeper than the coordinator.

“It’s never too late, but we have to put it together and put it together fast,” said tight end Dennis Pitta.

2. Lack of speed in the secondary is leading to big plays.

For two straight weeks, two fleet receivers, Odell Beckham Jr. of the Giants and Quincy Enunwa of the Jets, have taking a short pass and turned it into a long touchdown. Ravens safety Lardarius Webb was blown by both times, and the hamstring injury suffered by Webb on Sunday could lead to his days as a starter being over. And remember, still have to face two of the NFL’s top receivers twice – Antonio Brown of the Steelers, and A. J. Green of the Bengals.

3. Killer instinct is something the Ravens have lacked.

 That admission was made by coach John Harbaugh after Sunday’s 24-16 loss to the Jets.

“Killer instinct is executing when you get ahead, putting people away and making plays, taking advantage of the fact that they’re down,” Harbaugh said. “Whatever killer instinct translates to, we certainly don’t have it right now.”

They led 10-0 against the Jets. They led 10-0 against the Giants in Week 6. They led 10-7 at halftime against the Redskins in Week 5, but Baltimore was shutout in the second half.  And the Ravens led the Raiders, 27-21, in the fourth quarter in Week 4, only to lose 28-27 after the touchdown catch by Raiders wide receiver Michael Crabtree.

Yet the Ravens (3-4) lost all four games. Even when they get leads, they don’t usually play well enough to keep them.

4. The schedule gets tougher.

The Ravens have two games against the arch rival Steelers, who lead the division. They have two games against the Bengals, who had beaten the Ravens five straight times. They have road games against the Patriots (6-1) and Cowboys (5-1). The Ravens also face the surprising Eagles (4-2), which is the Ravens’ final home game in Week 15.

Even if the Ravens play better after the bye, better competition could prevent them from having better results.

The Ravens are 26-29 since winning Super Bowl XLVII.

The Ravens believe in reloading, not rebuilding. But they only have nine games left to avoid missing the playoffs for the third time in four years.


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Morning tip: What could 9-10 man rotation for Wizards look like?

Morning tip: What could 9-10 man rotation for Wizards look like?

With the roster down to the league-mandated maximum of 15 for the Wizards, the next step by coach Scott Brooks is to pare down his rotation with the regular-season opener Thursday at the Atlanta Hawks. 

“I like a nine-guy rotation," Brooks said after the preseason finale.

"Occasionally, 10 guys. The 10th guy doesn’t play as many minutes.”


According to what Brooks has more or less hinted already, the starting five remains as expected: John Wall, Bradley Beal, Otto Porter, Markieff Morris and Marcin Gortat. But how he slots the rest of the players, taking into account matchups, health and foul trouble, will vary during an 82-game season. 

The most tenuous spot appears to be behind Wall. While Trey Burke received more preseason minutes than Tomas Satoransky, the 6-7 Euro eventually could jump ahead of him if he's not careful. Satoransky's shot needs work but his passing, off-the-ball movement and defense look superior.

Since recovering from a thumb injury, Marcus Thornton registered time behind Beal.

Kelly Oubre battled Porter for the starting job and is the logical backup at small forward. Andrew Nicholson has secured his spot behind Morris, but because of an injury to Ian Mahinmi (knee) he's also spending time behind Gortat. Jason Smith can play power forward and center, too. 

That's 11 players, 1-2 more than Brooks would like for his rotation. The educated guess here is it'll be Burke or Satoransky to fall by the wayside with Thornton being that 10th player who gets the spot minutes. There's no rule against playing three forwards, for instance, with a point guard and a center. 

When Mahinmi returns to top form, Smith's minutes would seem the logical ones to get cut unless he develops a three-point shot to increase his value as a spread option.