Female official to work NFL game for 1st time

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Female official to work NFL game for 1st time

From Comcast SportsNet
SAN DIEGO (AP) -- Shannon Eastin will become the first female to officiate an NFL game when she works as a line judge for the Green Bay at San Diego preseason match Thursday night. The regular NFL officials have been locked out by the league. Eastin is a college referee who has worked in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (FCS division). She is one of the replacement officials hired by the NFL and has 16 years of experience. A resident of Tempe, Ariz., Eastin also has won six national judo championships. She was the youngest judo athlete ever to train at the U.S. Olympic Training Center, doing so when she was 11. The officiating team for the Hall of Fame game Sunday night included officials who have worked college games and some professional games, such as in the Arena Footbal League.

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Need to Know: Do the Redskins need a big day from Cousins to win?

Need to Know: Do the Redskins need a big day from Cousins to win?

Here is what you need to know on this Tuesday, December 6, five days before the Washington Redskins play the Philadelphia Eagles.

Timeline

Today's schedule: Off day

Days until: Panthers @ Redskins 14; Redskins @ Bears Christmas Eve 19; Giants @ Redskins, New Year’s Day 26

Injuries of note vs. Cardinals:
C Spencer Long (concussion), S Will Blackmon (concussion)
Postgame injury report

Last look at Redskins vs. Cardinals

Turning point: I have feeling that Sunday was a pivotal point in the season. When it’s all over the Cardinals game will either be looked at as the beginning of the end of their playoff run or as the low point that preceded a streak that got them into the playoffs.

A one-man show? One question raised on Sunday is whether the Redskins can win without a stellar performance from Kirk Cousins. His completion percentage of 56.8 on Sunday was his worst in any game this season. He made some nice passes but all in all he was not the guy who has carried the team for the past six weeks. If they are going to make the playoffs and perhaps do something when they get there the defense and running game are going to need to pitch in.

Pass happy play calling: The Redskins’ first four plays were passes. Then Rob Kelley went up the middle for 13 yards. The next five plays were passes. It was foreshadowing; during a game they never trailed by more than one score the Redskins called 39 passes and 17 runs. Kelley got 63 yards of 14 carries and Chris Thompson got 24 yards on two. Doing the math, the running backs averaged 5.4 yards per carry. I’m not one to nitpick the play calling but perhaps a few more handoffs would have helped move the ball more effectively.

Snap count spot check: Vernon Davis played every offensive snap but one. On defense, Duke Ihenacho played 64 snaps, his second-highest total of the season. They were in nickel a lot—Kendall Fuller played 55 snaps—but Su’a Cravens played only 37 snaps, about half.

Potpourri: If Dustin Hopkins was in a slump it looks like he’s out of it after booming a 53-yard field goal and pounding all six of his kickoffs for touchbacks . . . Although Davis did catch five passes for 47 yards with Jordan Reed out, he is missed as a second option when Reed can’t play . . . With Tyrann Mathieu, who usually covers the slot receiver, out Cousins tried to go to Jamison Crowder but he caught just three of the eight passes targeted to him . . . Like many games, we could stop all analysis of this game after seeing that the Redskins turned the ball over twice and didn’t manage to take it away.  

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Didn't matter who took what shots for Wizards in win over Nets

Didn't matter who took what shots for Wizards in win over Nets

BROOKLYN -- Does it really matter who gets the shot, as long as the Wizards make the right read and play at the end of a close game? They won Monday, 118-113 over the Nets, so no one will talk about Bradley Beal being scoreless after his three-pointer put them ahead for good with 3:12 left. 

"Not caring who scores the most, who gets the shot, just moving the ball, shooting with confidence," said Beal, who had 18 points on 7-for-18 shots, one fewer than John Wall. "All we have to do is worry about defense. We get whatever we want on offense. It’s just a matter of wanting to guard, get down and taking pride in it.”

The Wizards ended a difficult road trip, which started with losses in Oklahoma City and San Antonio when Otto Porter misfired at the end of regulation twice, by erasing a 15-point deficit with a defensive effort that contributed to seven players in double figures. 

Beal drained a three for a 107-106 lead for his final points. Wall ripped the ball on a handoff to Joe Harris for a dunk and Beal grabbed a defensive rebound when Brooklyn's Brook Lopez missed a three. Porter fouled out for the first time this season as he did plenty of the dirty work in the paint to limit Brooklyn's lopsided rebounding edge.

It's not that coach Scott Brooks didn't call plays for Beal. He did, but the Nets overplayed the double drag screen out of a timeout -- sending an extra defender in Harris to stop the pass from Wall to the top of the arc. Marcin Gortat flowed into a screen that freed Wall for an uncontested look in the slot from 24 feet that was good for a 112-106 lead. And Beal took on Wall's role, attacking the paint, drawing the defense and making a simple bounce pass to Gortat for the layup.  

“I thought the offensive execution was good. Everybody got involved. Keef got a bucket," said Brooks, alluding to the blown coverage by Trevor Booker that opened up Markieff Morris' backdoor cut and a feed from Wall for his game-high 13th assist and a 116-111 lead. "March got a bucket. John hit a couple of pull-up shots wide open. Brad hit a big three, got to the free throw line. That’s what you need. You heed to have all guys executing together and trusting the player that has the ball is going to make the right play, not necessarily for his shot but a good shot."

The Wizards (7-12) shot 45 of 93, or 48.4% from the field, and brought the Nets (5-15) down to 40 of 81, or 49.4%. Brooklyn began the game shooting better than 60% in the first quarter to put the Wizards in a deep hole. 

Late, the shots were much easier for the Wizards who used their ball pressure and playing over top of the handoffs to Harris and Bojan Bogdanovic.  

"Defense was giving me shots," said Wall, who was 4-for-6 in the fourth for 11 of his game-high 25 points. "I had it rolling. I just kept making them.

"We both have the edge where we both want the ball at the end of games. There are times where he should have it because he's been rolling the last couple of games. Other times it's a call that coach makes and we just go with it. ... I'm still looking for him, just like any other play. Sometimes teams try to do a good job of taking him away, denying him. We just got to go to the next option."

Beal anticipated a dribble handoff coming from Trevor Booker to Bogdanovic, jumped ahead of it and stole the ball with the Wizards ahead 116-113 with 12 seconds left. That led to a timeout, Wall making two foul shots after the ball was inbounded and the final margin.

Winning plays aren't always about winning shots. Beal made the last one.

[RELATED: Takeaways from Wizards comeback win vs. Nets]