Boxing champ announces his retirement

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Boxing champ announces his retirement

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- Boxer "Sugar" Shane Mosley is retiring, ending a career in which he won titles in three different weight classes, beat Oscar De La Hoya twice and never was knocked out. The 40-year-old announced on Twitter that he was hanging up his gloves, saying he "loved every moment of it. Win, lose or draw." Mosley lost three of his last four fights, including a dreary bout against Manny Pacquiao in May 2011 in which he mostly seemed to be avoiding the Filipino star in the ring. His last fight was May 5 on the undercard of the fight between Floyd Mayweather and Miguel Cotto. Mosley lost a lopsided decision to rising Mexican star Canelo Alvarez. The loss dropped his record to 46-8-1. Mosley began boxing at age 8 and wound up winning three U.S. Amateur titles and a bronze medal at the 1990 Goodwill Games. His professional career peaked when he won the WBC welterweight title by beating De La Hoya in 2000 before besting the popular fighter again in 2003 to claim the light middleweight title. Mosley also won the IBF lightweight belt in 1997 and was chosen fighter of the year by the Boxing Writers Association of America.

Ravens receiver Breshad Perriman hopes for better health for ailing father and himself

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Ravens receiver Breshad Perriman hopes for better health for ailing father and himself

As Ravens wide receiver Breshad Perriman looks forward to a healthier season, he is also dealing with his father’s health concerns.

Brett Perriman, who suffered a stroke May 3, has been transferred from a Miami area hospital to Atlanta for rehabilitation, according to The Miami Herald. The 50-year-old Perriman played for the Saints, Lions, Chiefs, and Dolphins during his 10-year NFL career.

On his Twitter account, Breshad Perriman offered encouragement for his father.

Perriman talked about his father’s health issues briefly following the Ravens’ first OTA session. This has been a difficult offseason for Perriman, who was very close to former Ravens cornerback Tray Walker, who died in a dirt bike accident in March.

“It’s been crazy,” Perriman said. “I’ve been through a lot this offseason, but it’s just making me stronger again and just learning to keep faith and pray a lot more. It’s been rough. It still is rough from time to time, but I’m steady getting through it, pushing through it and keeping faith.”

Perriman missed his entire rookie season with a knee injury, but looked 100 percent at OTA’s running pass routes.

“I don’t even think about it (knee injury) anymore,” Perriman said. “I feel great.

“Not being able to play, that was a hard thing … I feel much stronger. I feel like I went through a lot last year and it made me a better player and a better person.”

Perriman will continue to hope that better times are ahead, both for himself and for his father.

Kirk Cousins is excited about Jamison Crowder's growth, Josh Doctson's potential

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Kirk Cousins is excited about Jamison Crowder's growth, Josh Doctson's potential

Kirk Cousins says he's excited about up-and-coming receivers Jamison Crowder and Josh Doctson and what they'll add to the Redskins’ offense in 2016.

Cousins expects Crowder, who turns 23 next month, to make a significant jump in his second NFL offseason following a breakout rookie campaign.

“It’s a little bit of confidence and common sense, but when it’s your second year and you caught [that] many passes in your first year, you come in a little more confident and sure of yourself and you know what it means to be a pro now,” Cousins said.

A year ago at this time, Crowder was competing with veteran Andre Roberts for the slot receiver role. This offseason, all of those reps will belong to Crowder, who finished third on the team in catches (59) and receiving yards (604) in 2015.

The chemistry between Cousins and Crowder was apparent during Wednesday's practice, the first session of the spring open to media. On multiple occassions, Cousins completed tough passes to the shifty, 5 foot 8 playmaker as he was in full stride.

“All of that lends itself to taking another step forward,” Cousins added. “He’s a great teammate, smart player, has a natural sense of how to get open, how to run different option routes and choice routes, great natural hands and is really good after the catch pulling away from people. So, just add him of guys who we are excited about being able to throw to.”

The newest addition to that list, of course, is Doctson. Although Doctson, 23, was limited a bit this week due to a sore Achilles’ tendon, Cousins is already well aware of what the TCU product will bring to the Redskins’ offense.

Last season, tight end Jordan Reed was Washington’s biggest red zone threat. Now, Cousins will have Doctson, who is 6 foot 2, 206-pounds with a 41-inch vertical, as an option, as well.

“I went back and watched some of his highlights from TCU, and he is a special player,” Cousins said. “Looks like he can make the contested catch. It’s very natural for him to go up and catch that type of pass. He can run well. He has got great size. I almost thought he was a tight end when he showed up because if his size …having a guy like Josh could also be a great weapon in the red zone.”

The challenge for Docston over the remaining seven OTA practices will be getting more comfortable with the playbook so he can hit the ground running in Richmond. The challenge for Cousins will be identifying Doctson’s strengths and weaknesses, so he can develop the type of connection he already has with the other pass-catchers on the roster. 

“We’ll try to build that chemistry as he’s here and as we can work together and just learn what he does well and what fits him, what he is natural at and try to get him the football,” Cousins said. “We certainly can spread it around with all the talent at the outside positions.”

Which, obviously, is another challenge for Cousins, who now must find a way to keep Crowder, Doctson, Reed, DeSean Jackson and Pierre Garcon happy. That, however, is an issue for another blog post. 

Wizards extend scouting focus to West coast

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Wizards extend scouting focus to West coast

Three of the players interviewed by the Wizards at the NBA Draft Combine withdrew their names from consideration to return to college while the team continues to scout prospects and re-organizes within.

Jaron Blossomgame (Clemson), Josh Hart (Villanova) and Caleb Swanigan (Purdue) were among the 57 early-entry candidates to retain their college eligibility by withdrawing their names before the deadline Wednesday.

The Wizards’ scouting staff is currently out West where sports agencies such as CAA Sports, Landmark, Octagon and Wasserman Media Group are holding workouts for their rookies hoping to get drafted June 23 or find a home afterwards.

Maryland’s Robert Carter, who is projected to be a late first-round or early second-round pick, is training on the campus of UCLA, a representative for Life Sports Management told CSN. He was interviewed at the combine by the Wizards.

The league held a predraft combine in Chicago two weeks ago attended by 65 players. Blossomgame, Hart and Swanigan were among the 19 they interviewed.

The Wizards don’t have any picks, opting to trade what became their No. 13 spot for Markieff Morris. Their second-round pick was shipped in a deal last year that allowed them to acquire Kelly Oubre. But they still need to comb for prospects for Las Vegas summer league and training camp. 

They’ll begin predraft workouts at Verizon Center starting June 1.

Frank Ross is likely to be promoted internally to replace the post left by Marc Eversley who left for the Philadelphia 76ers, persons with knowledge of the situation told CSN. He'd be responsible for arranging the workouts among other duties. 

Ross has been director of player personnel and would be elevated to vice president of scouting.