Adrian Peterson on if he'll be ready for Week 1

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Adrian Peterson on if he'll be ready for Week 1

From Comcast SportsNet
MANKATO, Minn. (AP) -- The NFL season starts for Minnesota on Sept. 9, barely eight months after Adrian Peterson had reconstructive surgery on his ripped-up left knee. Despite the medical advances that have made comebacks from anterior cruciate ligament quicker than ever, Peterson's return for the opener against the Jaguars was always on an optimistic timetable. But for the star Vikings running back, that hasn't really been a goal. Belief is more like it. "Despite what everyone else had to say, that was my vision," said Peterson, who also tore the medial collateral ligament when he was hit during a game last Dec. 24 at Washington. "I knew it was going to be a journey, a path, to get closer to that vision, and I'm closer. I see it. It's closer now. It was far away in the beginning, but I've been working hard and just moving forward. "So hopefully here in a couple weeks -- here in a couple weeks, not hopefully -- that vision will be right there in front of me in my lap." Peterson has cleared every hurdle in his rehabilitation either ahead of time or on schedule. As nervous as the Vikings must be -- and as skeptical as some observers around the league might be -- he is probably as capable as anyone of taking the ball right at his tacklers without hesitation in Week 1. "You don't really want to put parameters on his rehabilitation. You want to just let it go and see where it takes us," coach Leslie Frazier said. "Our medical staff talked all along about what this process would look like and what's necessary. We're in that process right now, so we still have to take it day by day." Despite the evolution of the league into a passing-dominated game, Peterson is far too valuable for Minnesota (No. 29 in AP Pro32) to risk him getting hit the wrong way in some meaningless drill. He wore full pads in Tuesday's practice for the first time since his injury, but Frazier went out of his way to warn the defense not to touch him. On Peterson's first carry, he realized this wasn't going to be a normal play. "These guys are definitely not going to put their hands on me. I didn't really like that too much," he said. The defensive players light-heartedly complained to their coach that Peterson is usually the one delivering the punishing hits. "One of the things they told me was, Coach, you know how he runs. What about protecting us?' Frazier said. "He's not going to change his running style, we all know that, but they have to be smart out there and they know that." Peterson smiled when asked if he'd be letting up at all. "Oh, I'm going to lower my shoulder," he said. "Those guys are probably going to get tired of touching off and tired of me putting my shoulder into them. They'll start firing back, which is pretty much what I want them to do." His first contact will come later this month, maybe in practice next week or in the team's third preseason game Aug. 24 against San Diego. As offensive coordinator Bill Musgrave put it, Peterson "has to go through the mental gymnastics as well as the physical part." So far, so good. "We're all just amazed seeing him move and even cutting like he's always done," Frazier said, recalling a video review at the start of training camp of some offensive highlights from last season that included Peterson before he got hurt: "I came up to him and said, Can you see yourself in your mind being able to do that again?' He said, Coach, I can do that right now if you let me.' In his mind, there's nothing wrong."

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Caps make special arrangements for T.J. Oshie's dad, who has Alzheimer's

Caps make special arrangements for T.J. Oshie's dad, who has Alzheimer's

With the annual dads trip coming up, the Capitals are making special arrangements for T.J. Oshie. The team is allowing both his biological father, Tim Oshie, and his father-in-law, Dave Cosgrove, to come along. 

Tim, whom Oshie calls "Coach," has been battling Alzheimer's disease since at least 2012, according to an in-depth ESPN story published in 2014. 

Then playing for the Blues, Oshie described the episodes of disorientation and forgetfulness that led to his father's diagnosis. He and his family have been open about his father's Alzheimer's in hopes of raising awareness and letting people know they're not alone. 

The father and son due also participated in the Walk to End Alzheimer's back in 2014. 

"We have nothing right now as far as getting rid of it. With all the medicines and all the doctors in the world, I think it's something that hopefully we'll be able to stop – and get rid of sooner than later," Oshie told ESPN. "So that's why we talk about it, that's why we're open about it. Maybe not soon enough for my dad or for me, if that happens to be the case eventually down the road, but hopefully for my kids and my grandkids."

With Tim needing assistance to accompany his son on the Capitals' road trip, his father-in-law will there to help. 

The Caps pride themselves on a family atmosphere, so it's no surprise that the team would welcome an extra dad with open arms. 

MORE CAPITALS: Caps looking to bounce back after loss to Penguins

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The Wizards' '90's Night' has Tag Team and NBA Jam; sounds awesome

The Wizards' '90's Night' has Tag Team and NBA Jam; sounds awesome

The Wizards continue to win at Verizon Center.

After a slow start to the season, the John Wall-led Wizards have won five of their last six games and have not lost a game at home since a 124-116 loss to the Magic on Dec. 6. That's 12 consecutive wins at home. But if the winning wasn't enough, the organization ahs made sure that every game night has a party atmosphere to it.

Iconic R&B group New Edition performed for the fans who watched Wall and the Wizards beat the Nets 118-95 on Dec. 30 and following the team's 112-105 win over the Timberwolves on Jan. 6, the fans were treated to a concert from local go-go legends "The Backyard Band."

When the Wizards host the Celtics on Tuesday, Jan. 24 the organization will turn back the clocks to a more simple time, when they host "90's Night."

No trip back to the 1990's would be complete without a halftime concert from Tag Team, the hip-hop group responsible for the killer sports anthem "Whoomp, There It Is."

RELATED: MOST MEMORABLE NBA JERSEYS SINCE 2000

On top of that (and perhaps we're burrying the lede here), the pregame player introductions will be done by none other than Tim Kitzrow. Who is Tim Kitzrow? He's the man who provided the iconic voice for "NBA Jam."

Yes, THAT "NBA Jam."

I cannot begin to tell you how many hours of "NBA Jam" I logged on Sega Genesis. There's also a good chance I logged good minutes on NBA Jam WHILE listening to Tag Team's "Whoomop, There It Is."

The Wizards will also celebrate the 90's welcoming back famous former players Mark Alarie (1987-91), Tom Hammonds (1989-01) and Gheorghe Muresan (1993-97).

NBA Jam, Tag Team and Gheorghe Mursean?

That's how you do a 90's Night.

RELATED: HOW THE WIZARDS CAN GET TO 44 WINS