8 Olympic athletes banned for trying to lose

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8 Olympic athletes banned for trying to lose

From Comcast SportsNet
LONDON (AP) -- Eight female badminton doubles players were disqualified Wednesday from the London Olympics after trying to lose matches to receive a more favorable place in the tournament. The Badminton World Federation announced its ruling after investigating two teams from South Korea and one each from China and Indonesia. It punished them for "not using one's best efforts to win a match" and "conducting oneself in a manner that is clearly abusive or detrimental to the sport" in matches Tuesday night. "We applaud the federation for having taken swift and decisive action," IOC spokesman Mark Adams told The Associated Press. "Such behavior is incompatible with the Olympic values." Erick Thohir, the head of Indonesia's Olympic team, told the AP that the Indonesian team will appeal. The BWF said South Korea had also appealed. The competition was to continue later Wednesday. It was unclear if four eliminated teams would be placed into the quarterfinals or if the competition would restart at the semifinal stage. Thohir accused Chinese players of losing on purpose in the past. "China has been doing this so many times and they never get sanctioned by the BWF," Thohir said. "On the first game yesterday when China did it, the BWF didn't do anything. If the BWF do something on the first game and they say you are disqualified, it is a warning for everyone." IOC Vice President Craig Reedie, the former head of the international badminton federation, welcomed the decision. "Sport is competitive," Reedie told the AP. "If you lose the competitive element, then the whole thing becomes a nonsense. "You cannot allow a player to abuse the tournament like that, and not take firm action. So good on them." The eight disqualified players are world doubles champions Wang Xiaoli and Yu Yang of China and their South Korean opponents Jung Kyun-eun and Kim Ha-na, along with South Korea's Ha Jung-eun and Kim Min-jung and Indonesia's Meiliana Jauhari and Greysia Polii. The players went before a disciplinary hearing Wednesday, a day after spectators at the arena booed their performance after it became clear they were deliberately trying to lose. International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge had been at the venue but had left shortly before the drama unfolded. The IOC said it would allow badminton's ruling body to handle the matter. Paul Deighton, chief executive officer of the London organizers, said there would be no refunds for the evening's badminton program. Chairman Sebastian Coe called what happened "depressing," adding "who wants to sit through something like that?" Teams blamed the introduction of a round-robin stage rather than a straight knockout tournament as the main cause of the problem. In the round-robin format, losing one game can lead to an easier matchup in the next round. The Chinese players were accused of leading the way by deliberately losing a game. This led to other teams behaving in a similar way to try to force an easier quarterfinal. At one stage, both teams appeared to be trying to lose. Wang and Yu and their opponents were booed loudly by the crowd after dumping serves into the net and making simple errors, such as hitting the shuttlecock wide. The longest rally in their first game was only four strokes. The umpire warned them, and tournament referee Torsten Berg spoke to all four players but it had little effect. At one stage, Berg showed a black card, which usually means disqualification, but the game continued. Eventually, the Chinese women lost 21-14, 21-11 and both pairs were jeered off the court. One of the world's top male players, 2004 Olympic singles champion Taufik Hidayat of Indonesia, called the situation a "circus match." The teams had already qualified for knockout round, but the result ensured that the top-seeded Wang and Yu would have avoided playing their No. 2-seeded Chinese teammates until the final. The problem was repeated in the next women's doubles between South Korea's Ha and Kim Min-jung and their Indonesian opponents. Both teams were also warned for deliberately losing points in a match the South Koreans won 18-21, 21-14, 21-12. China's Lin Dan, the No. 2-ranked men's singles player, said through an interpreter the sport is going to be damaged. "Especially for the audience," he said before the disqualifications were announced. "This is definitely not within the Olympic spirit. But like I said before, it's not one-sided. Whoever sets the rule should make it knockout so whoever doesn't try will just leave the Olympics." Beijing badminton silver medalist Gail Emms said the matches were embarrassing to watch. "It was absolutely shocking," she said. "The crowds were booing and chanting 'Off, off, off.'"

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Despaigne allows four key runs in 6-2 Orioles loss

Despaigne allows four key runs in 6-2 Orioles loss

Twins 6, Orioles 2

Winner-Pressly (5-5)
Loser-Despaigne (0-2)

THE GOOD: In his first start since July 8, Ubaldo Jimenez delivered a creditable performance against the Twins. Jimenez allowed one run on five hits in five innings. He struck out eight and walked three. 

THE BAD: Odrisamer Despaigne followed Jimenez and he gave up four runs on five hits in 1 1/3 innings. The Twins scored four runs in the seventh to break a 2-2 tie.

Chaz Roe allowed the sixth run. 

The Orioles had won the first five games of the season series with the Twins.

MORE ORIOLES: HOW HR DERBY HAS AFFECTED O'S (OR NOT) IN PAST

THE UGLY: How often are two runners tagged out at home in one inning? 

In the fourth inning, Chris Davis and Mark Trumbo were thrown out at home on consecutive plays. 

Third baseman Eduardo Escobar threw home to nab Davis. Right fielder Max Kepler fired home to catch Trumbo. 

BREAKING THE SLUMP: Trumbo had been 0-for-18 until his fourth inning double. 

Chris Davis, who broke an 0-for-24 slump with a bunt single on Wednesday night, went 2-for-4. 

JOSEPH WITH NO RBIS: With his 0-for-3, Caleb Joseph now has 101 at-bats without an RBI.

LEADING IT OFF: Adam Jones hit his third leadoff home run on Kyle Gibson’s first pitch of the game. Jones has 19 this season. 

With his next home run, Jones will become the fourth Oriole to hit 20 this season. 

Jonathan Schoop has 17. If he hits three more, the Orioles will have five 20 home run hitters for the first time since 2012.

UP NEXT: The Orioles begin a three-game series in Toronto against the Blue Jays on Friday night. Kevin Gausman (2-7, 3.77) faces Marco Estrada (5-4, 2.94).

The Orioles (58-43) lead Toronto (57-43) by 1 ½ games in the AL East. 

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In context of Trumbo, a look at post-HR Derby power numbers for O's

In context of Trumbo, a look at post-HR Derby power numbers for O's

Mark Trumbo grounded out to short in his first at-bat on Thursday night. His hitless streak grew to 0-for-18 before a fourth-inning double, and he didn’t deny after Wednesday night’s game that he was tired. 

As can be expected, some readers have suggested that Trumbo’s participation in this month’s Home Run Derby hurt him.

Actually, Trumbo historically has lagged after the All-Star break. In his career, he bats .239 in the second half, 26 points lower than the first half. 

He hit 28 home runs before the All-Star break, and just two since. 

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It shouldn’t be a surprise that Trumbo has gone somewhat south. He’s played in each of the Orioles games, and didn’t have an All-Star break.

In fact after the Orioles had a grueling 10-game road trip to San Diego, Seattle and Los Angeles, they came home for three games and then Trumbo and his teammates flew back out west for the All-Star Game, then back East for the start of the second half. 

Last year, similar carping was heard about Manny Machado. He had 19 home runs at the All-Star break, participated in the Home Run Derby, then finished the year with 35.

In 2014, Adam Jones had 16 home runs prior to the Home Run Derby and 13 afterward, and in 2013, Chris Davis had 37 pre-All-Star Game and 16 in the second half. 

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Kerrigan insists he would've won state hoops title — if not for two NBA lottery picks

Kerrigan insists he would've won state hoops title — if not for two NBA lottery picks

Watch the full segment in the video player above

Ryan Kerrigan's 47.5 career sacks and 17 career forced fumbles are evidence that becoming an NFL player was the right career path for him to take. But football wasn't the only sport he played back as a high schooler in Muncie, Indiana.

"Baseball, I was a baseball player," Kerrigan said when Redskins Insider J.P. Finlay asked him what his secondary endeavors were as a teenager. "I was on the basketball team, [but] I wouldn't really call myself a 'player' 'cause that would've required me getting off the bench," he added.

While it sounds like the Bearcats' bench was plenty warm thanks to the now 27-year-old, Kerrigan did get the chance to be a part of a marquee matchup against some other soon-to-be-famous guys.

"My high school team was really good," he said. "State runner-up twice, and would've been state champs, I'd imagine, if we didn't run into Greg Oden and Mike Conley."

Oden and Conley, of course, both turned into stars on a 2007 Ohio State outfit that lost to Florida in the NCAA title game that year (which must've felt like justice being served to Kerrigan). They then went on to be lottery picks in the 2007 NBA Draft, and Conley just recently became the league's highest-paid man. So you could imagine how much of a handful they were in high school.

Some quick research reveals that Lawrence North (the squad that featured the two Buckeyes) topped Muncie Central (Kerrigan's side) in 2005 and 2006. No. 91 didn't specify which one of those championship bouts he was referring to, but that doesn't matter. What matters is that his legs didn't get too sore from sitting on the pine, and he eventually ended up with the Redskins.

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